Nearby nature in lockdown: Practices and affordances for leisure in urban green spaces

Authors: King, K. and Dickinson, J.

Journal: Leisure Studies

eISSN: 1466-4496

ISSN: 0261-4367

DOI: 10.1080/02614367.2022.2092646

Abstract:

During the Covid-19 pandemic, urban green spaces provided a route to connect with everyday ‘nearby natures’. The paper explores the reconfiguration of leisure practices during restrictions, utilising theory on affordances and social practices to explore what people valued in urban green spaces and what can be learnt from a period when relationships with these spaces were in sharp focus. The study participants utilised Mobile Instant Messaging Diaries to present their lived experiences first-hand. Participants developed routines that involved engaging with urban green spaces as part of their daily structure, and this brought practices based around meaningful actions in these spaces to the fore. Urban green spaces became meaningful when they served a purpose, when they built knowledge and skill, and when they supported social needs. During lockdown, a patchwork of urban green spaces became useful. The findings call for more attention to be paid to small pockets of urban green space to afford nature connectivity and to the value of a social practice lens as a tool for providers to explore affordances and exclusions.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/37110/

Source: Scopus

Nearby nature in lockdown: Practices and affordances for leisure in urban green spaces

Authors: King, K. and Dickinson, J.

Journal: LEISURE STUDIES

eISSN: 1466-4496

ISSN: 0261-4367

DOI: 10.1080/02614367.2022.2092646

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/37110/

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

Nearby nature in lockdown: Practices and affordances for leisure in urban green spaces

Authors: King, K. and Dickinson, J.

Journal: Leisure Studies

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISSN: 0261-4367

DOI: 10.1080/02614367.2022.2092646

Abstract:

During the Covid-19 pandemic, urban green spaces provided a route to connect with everyday ‘nearby natures’. The paper explores the reconfiguration of leisure practices during restrictions, utilising theory on affordances and social practices to explore what people valued in urban green spaces and what can be learnt from a period when relationships with these spaces were in sharp focus. The study participants utilised Mobile Instant Messaging Diaries to present their lived experiences first-hand. Participants developed routines that involved engaging with urban green spaces as part of their daily structure, and this brought practices based around meaningful actions in these spaces to the fore. Urban green spaces became meaningful when they served a purpose, when they built knowledge and skill, and when they supported social needs. During lockdown, a patchwork of urban green spaces became useful. The findings call for more attention to be paid to small pockets of urban green space to afford nature connectivity and to the value of a social practice lens as a tool for providers to explore affordances and exclusions.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/37110/

Source: Manual

Nearby nature in lockdown: Practices and affordances for leisure in urban green spaces

Authors: King, K. and Dickinson, J.E.

Journal: Leisure Studies

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISSN: 0261-4367

Abstract:

During the Covid-19 pandemic, urban green spaces provided a route to connect with everyday ‘nearby natures’. The paper explores the reconfiguration of leisure practices during restrictions, utilising theory on affordances and social practices to explore what people valued in urban green spaces and what can be learnt from a period when relationships with these spaces were in sharp focus. The study participants utilised Mobile Instant Messaging Diaries to present their lived experiences first-hand. Participants developed routines that involved engaging with urban green spaces as part of their daily structure, and this brought practices based around meaningful actions in these spaces to the fore. Urban green spaces became meaningful when they served a purpose, when they built knowledge and skill, and when they supported social needs. During lockdown, a patchwork of urban green spaces became useful. The findings call for more attention to be paid to small pockets of urban green space to afford nature connectivity and to the value of a social practice lens as a tool for providers to explore affordances and exclusions.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/37110/

Source: BURO EPrints