Science, policy and resilience: reflections on the role of scientific advice to government during pandemic crisis response

Authors: Reddin, K. and Miles, L.

Journal: Continuity and Resilience Review

Publisher: Emerald Insight

ISSN: 2516-7502

DOI: 10.1108/CRR-06-2022-0009

Abstract:

Purpose – The SARS epidemic in 2003 and the COVID-19 pandemic had a disruptive impact on countries around the world and highlight the importance of using scientific evidence to inform policy decisions and priorities during crises. The purpose of this article is to reflect upon the term “following the science” and examines the differences between SARS in 2003 and COVID-19.

Design/methodology/approach – This study is exploratory, adopts a qualitative approach and reflects on the synthesis of scientific evidence into advice informing government decisions on health interventions. Random sampling of the literature was used to avoid bias and was guided by the keywords.

Findings – It considers preparedness activities and the need for these to be integral in the design of future planning. It argues that simulation exercises be intrinsically linked to all aspects of crisis management and provide the opportunity to use the scientific evidence base as part of preparedness planning. The article concludes that more transparency in the use of scientific advice in strategic decision-making would support building more resilience into health emergency preparedness through an integrated systems approach.

Originality/value – This article contributes to the literature on the evaluation of the “following the science” approach and its implementation. It also contributes to the limited literature on simulation exercising to deal with health crises, like pandemics and identifies potential areas for further research or work on developing an integrated systems approach to pandemic preparedness.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/37575/

https://www.emerald.com/insight/2516-7502.htm

Source: Manual

Science, policy and resilience: reflections on the role of scientific advice to government during pandemic crisis response

Authors: Reddin, K. and Miles, L.

Journal: Continuity and Resilience Review

Publisher: Emerald Insight

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/37575/

https://www.emerald.com/insight/content/doi/10.1108/CRR-06-2022-0009/full/html

Source: Manual

Science, policy and resilience: reflections on the role of scientific advice to government during pandemic crisis response

Authors: Reddin, K. and Miles, L.

Journal: Continuity and Resilience Review

Publisher: Emerald Insight

ISSN: 2516-7502

Abstract:

Purpose – The SARS epidemic in 2003 and the COVID-19 pandemic had a disruptive impact on countries around the world and highlight the importance of using scientific evidence to inform policy decisions and priorities during crises. The purpose of this article is to reflect upon the term “following the science” and examines the differences between SARS in 2003 and COVID-19.

Design/methodology/approach – This study is exploratory, adopts a qualitative approach and reflects on the synthesis of scientific evidence into advice informing government decisions on health interventions. Random sampling of the literature was used to avoid bias and was guided by the keywords.

Findings – It considers preparedness activities and the need for these to be integral in the design of future planning. It argues that simulation exercises be intrinsically linked to all aspects of crisis management and provide the opportunity to use the scientific evidence base as part of preparedness planning. The article concludes that more transparency in the use of scientific advice in strategic decision-making would support building more resilience into health emergency preparedness through an integrated systems approach.

Originality/value – This article contributes to the literature on the evaluation of the “following the science” approach and its implementation. It also contributes to the limited literature on simulation exercising to deal with health crises, like pandemics and identifies potential areas for further research or work on developing an integrated systems approach to pandemic preparedness.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/37575/

Source: BURO EPrints