Testing the relationship between lateralization on sequence-based motor tasks and language laterality using an online battery

Authors: Grant, J.H., Parker, A.J., Hodgson, J.C., Hudson, J.M. and Bishop, D.V.M.

Journal: Laterality

eISSN: 1464-0678

ISSN: 1357-650X

DOI: 10.1080/1357650X.2022.2129668

Abstract:

Studies have highlighted an association between motor laterality and speech production laterality. It is thought that common demands for sequential processing may underlie this association. However, most studies in this area have relied on relatively small samples and have infrequently explored the reliability of the tools used to assess lateralization. We, therefore, established the validity and reliability of an online battery measuring sequence-based motor laterality and language laterality before exploring the associations between laterality indices on language and motor tasks. The online battery was completed by 621 participants, 52 of whom returned to complete the battery a second time. The three motor tasks included in the battery showed good between-session reliability (r ≥.78) and were lateralized in concordance with hand preference. The novel measure of speech production laterality was left lateralized at population level as predicted, but reliability was less satisfactory (r =.62). We found no evidence of an association between sequence-based motor laterality and language laterality. Those with a left-hand preference were more strongly lateralized on motor tasks requiring midline crossing; this effect was not observed in right-handers. We conclude that there is little evidence of the co-lateralization of language and sequence-based motor skill on this battery.

Source: Scopus

Testing the relationship between lateralization on sequence-based motor tasks and language laterality using an online battery.

Authors: Grant, J.H., Parker, A.J., Hodgson, J.C., Hudson, J.M. and Bishop, D.V.M.

Journal: Laterality

Pages: 1-31

eISSN: 1464-0678

DOI: 10.1080/1357650X.2022.2129668

Abstract:

ABSTRACTStudies have highlighted an association between motor laterality and speech production laterality. It is thought that common demands for sequential processing may underlie this association. However, most studies in this area have relied on relatively small samples and have infrequently explored the reliability of the tools used to assess lateralization. We, therefore, established the validity and reliability of an online battery measuring sequence-based motor laterality and language laterality before exploring the associations between laterality indices on language and motor tasks. The online battery was completed by 621 participants, 52 of whom returned to complete the battery a second time. The three motor tasks included in the battery showed good between-session reliability (r ≥ .78) and were lateralized in concordance with hand preference. The novel measure of speech production laterality was left lateralized at population level as predicted, but reliability was less satisfactory (r = .62). We found no evidence of an association between sequence-based motor laterality and language laterality. Those with a left-hand preference were more strongly lateralized on motor tasks requiring midline crossing; this effect was not observed in right-handers. We conclude that there is little evidence of the co-lateralization of language and sequence-based motor skill on this battery.

Source: PubMed

Testing the relationship between lateralization on sequence-based motor tasks and language laterality using an online battery

Authors: Grant, J.H., Parker, A.J., Hodgson, J.C., Hudson, J.M. and Bishop, D.V.M.

Journal: LATERALITY

eISSN: 1464-0678

ISSN: 1357-650X

DOI: 10.1080/1357650X.2022.2129668

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

Testing the relationship between lateralization on sequence-based motor tasks and language laterality using an online battery.

Authors: Grant, J.H., Parker, A.J., Hodgson, J.C., Hudson, J.M. and Bishop, D.V.M.

Journal: Laterality

Pages: 1-31

eISSN: 1464-0678

ISSN: 1357-650X

DOI: 10.1080/1357650x.2022.2129668

Abstract:

ABSTRACTStudies have highlighted an association between motor laterality and speech production laterality. It is thought that common demands for sequential processing may underlie this association. However, most studies in this area have relied on relatively small samples and have infrequently explored the reliability of the tools used to assess lateralization. We, therefore, established the validity and reliability of an online battery measuring sequence-based motor laterality and language laterality before exploring the associations between laterality indices on language and motor tasks. The online battery was completed by 621 participants, 52 of whom returned to complete the battery a second time. The three motor tasks included in the battery showed good between-session reliability (r  .78) and were lateralized in concordance with hand preference. The novel measure of speech production laterality was left lateralized at population level as predicted, but reliability was less satisfactory (r = .62). We found no evidence of an association between sequence-based motor laterality and language laterality. Those with a left-hand preference were more strongly lateralized on motor tasks requiring midline crossing; this effect was not observed in right-handers. We conclude that there is little evidence of the co-lateralization of language and sequence-based motor skill on this battery.

Source: Europe PubMed Central