Exploring the relationship between perceived loneliness and subjective cognitive decline in older individuals

Authors: Pecchinenda, A., Yankouskaya, A., Boccia, M., Piccardi, L., Guariglia, C. and Giannini, A.M.

Journal: Aging and Mental Health

Volume: 28

Issue: 1

Pages: 73-82

eISSN: 1364-6915

ISSN: 1360-7863

DOI: 10.1080/13607863.2023.2242291

Abstract:

Objective: Loneliness has been associated to a greater risk of cognitive decline and dementia in older individuals. However, evidence on whether this association also exists for older individuals who complain of cognitive problems is limited. We conducted a survey to examine the association between subjective cognitive decline in the working memory domain, perceived loneliness, depression, anxiety, and stress in older individuals with different profiles. Methods: A total of 302 healthy, old individuals completed 3 questionnaires to assess subjective cognitive problems in attention, executive functions, storage, depression, anxiety, stress, and perceived loneliness. Results: We conducted a cluster analysis and 3 clusters of individuals with different profiles emerged. Individuals with greater subjective cognitive problems (cluster 1) in the attention and storage domains, reported higher perceived loneliness and stress but not depression. In contrast, individuals with the least subjective cognitive problems (cluster 3) in the storage domain, reported lower perceived loneliness. Conclusions: Individuals with higher subjective cognitive decline also report higher levels of perceived loneliness but not more depression than their peers. However, this correlation is present only for individuals with mild subjective cognitive decline (cluster 2). The implications for future research and interventions are discussed.

https://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/38849/

Source: Scopus

Exploring the relationship between perceived loneliness and subjective cognitive decline in older individuals.

Authors: Pecchinenda, A., Yankouskaya, A., Boccia, M., Piccardi, L., Guariglia, C. and Giannini, A.M.

Journal: Aging Ment Health

Volume: 28

Issue: 1

Pages: 73-82

eISSN: 1364-6915

DOI: 10.1080/13607863.2023.2242291

Abstract:

OBJECTIVE: Loneliness has been associated to a greater risk of cognitive decline and dementia in older individuals. However, evidence on whether this association also exists for older individuals who complain of cognitive problems is limited. We conducted a survey to examine the association between subjective cognitive decline in the working memory domain, perceived loneliness, depression, anxiety, and stress in older individuals with different profiles. METHODS: A total of 302 healthy, old individuals completed 3 questionnaires to assess subjective cognitive problems in attention, executive functions, storage, depression, anxiety, stress, and perceived loneliness. RESULTS: We conducted a cluster analysis and 3 clusters of individuals with different profiles emerged. Individuals with greater subjective cognitive problems (cluster 1) in the attention and storage domains, reported higher perceived loneliness and stress but not depression. In contrast, individuals with the least subjective cognitive problems (cluster 3) in the storage domain, reported lower perceived loneliness. CONCLUSIONS: Individuals with higher subjective cognitive decline also report higher levels of perceived loneliness but not more depression than their peers. However, this correlation is present only for individuals with mild subjective cognitive decline (cluster 2). The implications for future research and interventions are discussed.

https://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/38849/

Source: PubMed

Exploring the relationship between perceived loneliness and subjective cognitive decline in older individuals

Authors: Pecchinenda, A., Yankouskaya, A., Boccia, M., Piccardi, L., Guariglia, C. and Giannini, A.M.

Journal: AGING & MENTAL HEALTH

eISSN: 1364-6915

ISSN: 1360-7863

DOI: 10.1080/13607863.2023.2242291

https://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/38849/

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

Exploring the relationship between perceived loneliness and subjective cognitive decline in older individuals.

Authors: Pecchinenda, A., Yankouskaya, A., Boccia, M., Piccardi, L., Guariglia, C. and Giannini, A.M.

Journal: Aging & mental health

Volume: 28

Issue: 1

Pages: 73-82

eISSN: 1364-6915

ISSN: 1360-7863

DOI: 10.1080/13607863.2023.2242291

Abstract:

Objective

Loneliness has been associated to a greater risk of cognitive decline and dementia in older individuals. However, evidence on whether this association also exists for older individuals who complain of cognitive problems is limited. We conducted a survey to examine the association between subjective cognitive decline in the working memory domain, perceived loneliness, depression, anxiety, and stress in older individuals with different profiles.

Methods

A total of 302 healthy, old individuals completed 3 questionnaires to assess subjective cognitive problems in attention, executive functions, storage, depression, anxiety, stress, and perceived loneliness.

Results

We conducted a cluster analysis and 3 clusters of individuals with different profiles emerged. Individuals with greater subjective cognitive problems (cluster 1) in the attention and storage domains, reported higher perceived loneliness and stress but not depression. In contrast, individuals with the least subjective cognitive problems (cluster 3) in the storage domain, reported lower perceived loneliness.

Conclusions

Individuals with higher subjective cognitive decline also report higher levels of perceived loneliness but not more depression than their peers. However, this correlation is present only for individuals with mild subjective cognitive decline (cluster 2). The implications for future research and interventions are discussed.

https://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/38849/

Source: Europe PubMed Central

Exploring the relationship between perceived loneliness and subjective cognitive decline in older individuals.

Authors: Pecchinenda, A., Yankouskaya, A., Boccia, M., Piccardi, L., Guariglia, C. and Giannini, A.M.

Journal: Aging and Mental Health

ISSN: 1364-6915

Abstract:

OBJECTIVE: Loneliness has been associated to a greater risk of cognitive decline and dementia in older individuals. However, evidence on whether this association also exists for older individuals who complain of cognitive problems is limited. We conducted a survey to examine the association between subjective cognitive decline in the working memory domain, perceived loneliness, depression, anxiety, and stress in older individuals with different profiles. METHODS: A total of 302 healthy, old individuals completed 3 questionnaires to assess subjective cognitive problems in attention, executive functions, storage, depression, anxiety, stress, and perceived loneliness. RESULTS: We conducted a cluster analysis and 3 clusters of individuals with different profiles emerged. Individuals with greater subjective cognitive problems (cluster 1) in the attention and storage domains, reported higher perceived loneliness and stress but not depression. In contrast, individuals with the least subjective cognitive problems (cluster 3) in the storage domain, reported lower perceived loneliness. CONCLUSIONS: Individuals with higher subjective cognitive decline also report higher levels of perceived loneliness but not more depression than their peers. However, this correlation is present only for individuals with mild subjective cognitive decline (cluster 2). The implications for future research and interventions are discussed.

https://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/38849/

Source: BURO EPrints