Predicting successful brachial plexus block using changes in skin electrical resistance.

This source preferred by Gary Smith

Authors: Smith, G.B., Wilson, G.R., Curry, C.H., May, S.N., Arthurson, G.M., Robinson, D.A. and Cross, G.D.

Journal: Br.J.Anaesth.

Volume: 60

Issue: 6

Pages: 703-708

Skin electrical resistance is determined by the degree of sweating of the skin which is, in turn, related to sympathetic nervous system activity in the area concerned. It is increased when the nerves supplying the area are damaged or blocked by local anaesthetic agents. We have assessed the temporal and spatial relationship between the onset of sympathetic and sensory loss in the hand following brachial plexus block in 44 patients. Skin electrical resistance, measured using a simple ohm meter, has been shown to increase within 2 min of brachial plexus blockade with 1% lignocaine and adrenaline 1:200,000. This increase is an early and reliable indicator of subsequent, and occasionally delayed, sensory loss

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Smith, G.B., Wilson, G.R., Curry, C.H., May, S.N., Arthurson, G.M., Robinson, D.A. and Cross, G.D.

Journal: Br J Anaesth

Volume: 60

Issue: 6

Pages: 703-708

ISSN: 0007-0912

DOI: 10.1093/bja/60.6.703

Skin electrical resistance is determined by the degree of sweating of the skin which is, in turn, related to sympathetic nervous system activity in the area concerned. It is increased when the nerves supplying the area are damaged or blocked by local anaesthetic agents. We have assessed the temporal and spatial relationship between the onset of sympathetic and sensory loss in the hand following brachial plexus block in 44 patients. Skin electrical resistance, measured using a simple ohm meter, has been shown to increase within 2 min of brachial plexus blockade with 1% lignocaine and adrenaline 1:200,000. This increase is an early and reliable indicator of subsequent, and occasionally delayed, sensory loss.

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Smith, G.B., Wilson, G.R., Curry, C.H., May, S.N., Arthurson, G.M., Robinson, D.A. and Cross, G.D.

Journal: British journal of anaesthesia

Volume: 60

Issue: 6

Pages: 703-708

eISSN: 1471-6771

ISSN: 0007-0912

Skin electrical resistance is determined by the degree of sweating of the skin which is, in turn, related to sympathetic nervous system activity in the area concerned. It is increased when the nerves supplying the area are damaged or blocked by local anaesthetic agents. We have assessed the temporal and spatial relationship between the onset of sympathetic and sensory loss in the hand following brachial plexus block in 44 patients. Skin electrical resistance, measured using a simple ohm meter, has been shown to increase within 2 min of brachial plexus blockade with 1% lignocaine and adrenaline 1:200,000. This increase is an early and reliable indicator of subsequent, and occasionally delayed, sensory loss.

The data on this page was last updated at 04:57 on June 24, 2019.