Eradicating the invasive topmouth gudgeon, Pseudorasbora parva, from a recreational fishery in northern England

This source preferred by Robert Britton

Authors: Brazier, M. and Britton, J.R.

http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1365-2400.2006.00510.x

Journal: Fisheries Management and Ecology

Volume: 13

Pages: 329-335

ISSN: 0969-997X

DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2400.2006.00510.x

An established population of the invasive topmouth gudgeon, Pseudorasbora parva (Temminck & Schlegel), was discovered in a recreational fishery in Northwest England in 2002. As the lake was seasonally connected to a river catchment, providing potential for dispersal, a containment and eradication programme was initiated. Containment involved screening of outfalls and preventing fish movements off site. Eradication involved the fishery being treated twice with a rotenone-based piscicide, in March and April 2005. The mean P. parva density prior to rotenone application was 6.1 m2; following the application, none were recorded. Non-target species in the fishery were removed prior to the application; following rotenone degradation, they were re-introduced and subsequently spawned, with recording of young-of-the-year. This contrasts with 2004 when only young-of-the-year of P. parva were recorded. As the eradication appeared to be successful, the method is considered suitable for use on other populations posing a similar threat of dispersal of the species into rivers and on other invasive fish populations in undesirable locations.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Britton, J.R. and Brazier, M.

Journal: Fisheries Management and Ecology

Volume: 13

Issue: 5

Pages: 329-335

eISSN: 1365-2400

ISSN: 0969-997X

DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2400.2006.00510.x

An established population of the invasive topmouth gudgeon, Pseudorasbora parva (Temminck & Schlegel), was discovered in a recreational fishery in Northwest England in 2002. As the lake was seasonally connected to a river catchment, providing potential for dispersal, a containment and eradication programme was initiated. Containment involved screening of outfalls and preventing fish movements off site. Eradication involved the fishery being treated twice with a rotenone-based piscicide, in March and April 2005. The mean P. parva density prior to rotenone application was 6.1m-2; following the application, none were recorded. Non-target species in the fishery were removed prior to the application; following rotenone degradation, they were re-introduced and subsequently spawned, with recording of young-of-the-year. This contrasts with 2004 when only young-of-the-year of P. parva were recorded. As the eradication appeared to be successful, the method is considered suitable for use on other populations posing a similar threat of dispersal of the species into rivers and on other invasive fish populations in undesirable locations. © 2006 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Britton, J.R. and Brazier, M.

Journal: FISHERIES MANAGEMENT AND ECOLOGY

Volume: 13

Issue: 5

Pages: 329-335

ISSN: 0969-997X

DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2400.2006.00510.x

The data on this page was last updated at 05:01 on July 17, 2019.