Preventing childhood obesity by reducing consumption of carbonated drinks: Cluster randomised controlled trial

This source preferred by David Kerr and Janet James

Authors: James, J., Thomas, P., Cavan, D.A. and Kerr, D.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/1188/

http://www.bmj.com/cgi/reprint/328/7450/1237

Journal: British Medical Journal

Volume: 328

Pages: 1236-1240

ISSN: 0959-8146

DOI: 10.1136/bmj.38077.458438.EE

Objective To determine if a school based educational programme aimed at reducing consumption of carbonated drinks can prevent excessive weight gain in children.

Design Cluster randomised controlled trial.

Setting Six primary schools in southwest England.

Participants 644 children aged 7-11 years.

Intervention Focused educational programme on nutrition over one school year.

Main outcome measures Drink consumption and number of overweight and obese children.

Results Consumption of carbonated drinks over three days decreased by 0.6 glasses (average glass size 250 ml) in the intervention group but increased by 0.2 glasses in the control group (mean difference 0.7, 95% confidence interval 0.1 to 1.3). At 12 months the percentage of overweight and obese children increased in the control group by 7.5%, compared with a decrease in the intervention group of 0.2% (mean difference 7.7%, 2.2% to 13.1%).

Conclusion A targeted, school based education programme produced a modest reduction in the number of carbonated drinks consumed, which was associated with a reduction in the number of overweight and obese children.

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: James, J., Thomas, P., Cavan, D. and Kerr, D.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/1188/

Journal: BMJ

Volume: 328

Issue: 7450

Pages: 1237

eISSN: 1756-1833

DOI: 10.1136/bmj.38077.458438.EE

OBJECTIVE: To determine if a school based educational programme aimed at reducing consumption of carbonated drinks can prevent excessive weight gain in children. DESIGN: Cluster randomised controlled trial. SETTING: Six primary schools in southwest England. PARTICIPANTS: 644 children aged 7-11 years. INTERVENTION: Focused educational programme on nutrition over one school year. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Drink consumption and number of overweight and obese children. RESULTS: Consumption of carbonated drinks over three days decreased by 0.6 glasses (average glass size 250 ml) in the intervention group but increased by 0.2 glasses in the control group (mean difference 0.7, 95% confidence interval 0.1 to 1.3). At 12 months the percentage of overweight and obese children increased in the control group by 7.5%, compared with a decrease in the intervention group of 0.2% (mean difference 7.7%, 2.2% to 13.1%). CONCLUSION: A targeted, school based education programme produced a modest reduction in the number of carbonated drinks consumed, which was associated with a reduction in the number of overweight and obese children.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: James, J., Thomas, P., Cavan, D. and Kerr, D.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/1188/

Journal: British Medical Journal

Volume: 328

Issue: 7450

Pages: 1237-1239

ISSN: 0959-8146

Objective: To determine if a school based educational programme aimed at reducing consumption of carbonated drinks can prevent excessive weight gain in children. Design: Cluster randomised controlled trial. Setting: Six primary schools in south west England. Participants: 644 children aged 7-11 years. Intervention: Focused educational programme on nutrition over one school year. Main outcome measures: Drink consumption and number of overweight and obese children. Results: Consumption of carbonated drinks over three days decreased by 0.6 glasses (average glass size 250 ml) in the intervention group but increased by 0.2 glasses in the control group (mean difference 0.7, 95% confidence interval 0.1 to 1.3). At 12 months the percentage of overweight and obese children increased in the control group by 7.6%, compared with a decrease in the intervention group of 0.2% (mean difference 7.7%, 2.2% to 13.1%). Conclusion: A targeted, school based education programme produced a modest reduction in the number of carbonated drinks consumed, which was associated with a reduction in the number of overweight and obese children.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: James, J., Thomas, P., Cavan, D. and Kerr, D.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/1188/

Journal: BMJ-BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL

Volume: 328

Issue: 7450

Pages: 1237-1239

ISSN: 1756-1833

DOI: 10.1136/bmj.38077.458438.EE

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: James, J., Thomas, P., Cavan, D. and Kerr, D.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/1188/

Journal: BMJ (Clinical research ed.)

Volume: 328

Issue: 7450

Pages: 1237

eISSN: 1756-1833

ISSN: 0959-8138

OBJECTIVE: To determine if a school based educational programme aimed at reducing consumption of carbonated drinks can prevent excessive weight gain in children. DESIGN: Cluster randomised controlled trial. SETTING: Six primary schools in southwest England. PARTICIPANTS: 644 children aged 7-11 years. INTERVENTION: Focused educational programme on nutrition over one school year. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Drink consumption and number of overweight and obese children. RESULTS: Consumption of carbonated drinks over three days decreased by 0.6 glasses (average glass size 250 ml) in the intervention group but increased by 0.2 glasses in the control group (mean difference 0.7, 95% confidence interval 0.1 to 1.3). At 12 months the percentage of overweight and obese children increased in the control group by 7.5%, compared with a decrease in the intervention group of 0.2% (mean difference 7.7%, 2.2% to 13.1%). CONCLUSION: A targeted, school based education programme produced a modest reduction in the number of carbonated drinks consumed, which was associated with a reduction in the number of overweight and obese children.

The data on this page was last updated at 19:59 on June 9, 2020.