Caring for a partner with Alzheimer's disease: Intimacy, loss and the life that is possible

This source preferred by Les Todres

Authors: Todres, L. and Galvin, K.T.

http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content~content=a743921610~db=all~order=page

Journal: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being

Volume: 1

Pages: 50-61

ISSN: 1748-2623

DOI: 10.1080/17482620500518085

In this article, a phenomenological study, we aim to contribute to a deeper understanding of caring for a partner with advancing memory loss. Our particular concern is to communicate the findings in evocative and empathic ways. Such an approach is based on a wish to complement the phenomenological rigor of Giorgi's "scientific concern" with a "communicative concern." We draw attention to the aesthetic dimensions of phenomenological description to achieve both "structure" and "texture" in the way findings are communicated. The methodology is thus complemented by a further interpretive phase after presentation of each of six general structures, and characterized as 'embodied interpretation'. This discipline is based on Gendlin's experiential phenomenology and the practice of "focusing." We suggest that by engaging with the kind of descriptions and interpretations offered, fellow carers, professionals, family and support groups could be better equipped to understand the issues discussed.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Todres, L. and Galvin, K.

Journal: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being

Volume: 1

Issue: 1

Pages: 50-61

eISSN: 1748-2631

ISSN: 1748-2623

DOI: 10.1080/17482620500518085

In this article, a phenomenological study, we aim to contribute to a deeper understanding of caring for a partner with advancing memory loss. Our particular concern is to communicate the findings in evocative and empathic ways. Such an approach is based on a wish to complement the phenomenological rigor of Giorgi's "scientific concern" with a "communicative concern." We draw attention to the aesthetic dimensions of phenomenological description to achieve both "structure" and "texture" in the way findings are communicated. The methodology is thus complemented by a further interpretive phase after presentation of each of six general structures, and characterized as embodied interpretation'. This discipline is based on Gendlin's experiential phenomenology and the practice of "focusing." We suggest that by engaging with the kind of descriptions and interpretations offered, fellow carers, professionals, family and support groups could be better equipped to understand the issues discussed. © 2006 Informa UK Ltd All rights reserved.

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