The qualitative description of human experience: The aesthetic dimension

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Authors: Todres, L.

Journal: Qualitative Health Research

Volume: 8

Pages: 121-127

ISSN: 1049-7323

DOI: 10.1177/104973239800800109

This article asks the question: What kind of qualitative descriptions of human experience produce a feeling of understanding in the reader? The answer to this question may involve not only issues about truth (validity) but also issues about beauty (aesthetics). The themes discussed include the relationship between the structure and texture of an experience, the relationship between the concrete and abstract uses of language, and the relationship between the individual and general levels of description. The article draws on the thought of Dilthey, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, and Hillman to articulate the need for using language in a way that serves the qualitative dimensions of experience. This tradition would ask for a way of communicating our descriptions that can retain their concrete and embodied occasions; it wishes to return texture to structure and thus involve readers in forms of understanding that cannot be separated from aesthetic participation.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Todres, L.

Journal: Qualitative Health Research

Volume: 8

Issue: 1

Pages: 121-127

ISSN: 1049-7323

DOI: 10.1177/104973239800800109

This article asks the question: What kind of qualitative descriptions of human experience produce a feeling of understanding in the reader? The answer to this question may involve not only issues about truth (validity) but also issues about beauty (aesthetics). The themes discussed include the relationship between the structure and texture of an experience, the relationship between the concrete and abstract uses of language, and the relationship between the individual and general levels of description. The article draws on the thought of Dilthey, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, and Hillman to articulate the need for using language in a way that serves the qualitative dimensions of experience. This tradition would ask for a way of communicating our descriptions that can retain their concrete and embodied occasions; it wishes to return texture to structure and thus involve readers informs of understanding that cannot be separated from aesthetic participation.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Todres, L.

Journal: QUALITATIVE HEALTH RESEARCH

Volume: 8

Issue: 1

Pages: 121-127

ISSN: 1049-7323

DOI: 10.1177/104973239800800109

The data on this page was last updated at 05:30 on January 21, 2021.