An evidence-based strategy for midwifery education

Authors: Thomas, B.G.

Journal: Evidence Based Midwifery

Volume: 5

Issue: 2

Pages: 47-53

ISSN: 1479-4489

Abstract:

Background. Midwifery education in the UK moved into the higher education sector in the early 1990s. The challenge for education programmes since then has been to be cost-effective, innovative and up to date, but there is also a need for modern midwifery education to support the development of woman-centred practitioners. Aim. This paper proposes a strategic approach for midwifery education, based on the empirical findings from a grounded theory study and relevant literature. Method. The study is presented in detail in two previous papers (Thomas, 2006, 2007) but a synopsis of the research is described here. The research was based on grounded theory and comprised four phases of data collection with two groups of midwives - 14 who worked in an NHS maternity unit and nine who were employed outside of conventional services. Findings. Student midwives benefit from repeated participation in birth without intervention and from being supported by role models with the confidence to advocate for the women in their care. This impacts on the place of students' practice learning in their programme, the types of midwives with whom they practice and the pattern of care delivery to which they are exposed, as well as on the learning and teaching methods used. A strategic approach to programme development may promote positive experiences that would help students to develop their belief in women, normal physiological birth and the abilities of midwives, and to become 'woman-centred' midwives. Conclusions. A strategic approach to midwifery education, which helps students learn to believe in women's abilities to give birth without routine intervention and in their own abilities to support this, may benefit midwives and women. © 2007 The Royal College of Midwives.

Source: Scopus

An evidence-based strategy for midwifery education

Authors: Thomas, B.G.

Journal: Evidence Based Midwifery

Volume: 5

Pages: 47-53

ISSN: 1479-4489

Abstract:

Aim: This paper proposes a strategic approach for midwifery education, based on the empirical findings from a grounded theory study and relevant literature.

Method: The study is presented in detail in two previous papers (Thomas 2006, Thomas 2007) but a synopsis of the research is described here. The research was based on grounded theory and had four phases of data collection with two groups of midwives- fourteen who worked in an NHS maternity unit and nine who are employed outside of conventional services.

Findings/ results: Student midwives benefit from repeated participation in birth without intervention and from being supported by role models with the confidence to advocate for women in their care. This impacts on the place of students’ practice learning in their programme, the types of midwives with whom they practice and the pattern of care delivery to which they are exposed as well as on the learning and teaching methods used. A strategic approach to programme development may promote positive experiences which help students to develop their belief in women, normal physiological birth and the abilities of midwives, and to become ‘woman-centred’ midwives.

Conclusion: A strategic approach to midwifery education, which helps students learn to believe in women’s abilities to give birth without routine intervention and in their own abilities to support this, may benefit midwives and women.

http://bournemouth.library.ingentaconnect.com/content/rcm/ebm/2007/00000005/00000002/art00003

Source: Manual

Preferred by: Gail Thomas

The data on this page was last updated at 11:38 on September 6, 2021.