Contrasting life history traits of invasive topmouth gudgeon (Pseudorasbora parva) in adjacent ponds in England

This source preferred by Robert Britton

Authors: Britton, J.R., Davies, G.D. and Brazier, M.

http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/121487257/abstract

Journal: Journal of Applied Ichthyology

Volume: 24

Pages: 694-698

ISSN: 0175-8659

DOI: 10.1111/j.1439-0426.2008.01163.x

Two topmouth gudgeon Pseudorasbora parva populations were studied in adjacent ponds in Northwest England to determine the influence of density on the expression of their life history traits. Initial introduction into one of these ponds had been in 2000, with establishment of an abundant population (density in March 2005: 6.1 ± 3.2 m−2). Their transfer into the adjacent pond only occurred during brief periods of seasonal connection; this population was of low abundance (density in March 2005: 0.6 ± 0.5 m−2) and was still colonising the pond at the time of sampling. In the low-density population, individuals were significantly faster growing, maturing earlier (generally in their first year of life) and more fecund at length and age (mean batch fecundity at 50 mm: 883 compared with 473 eggs). These traits were advantageous in maximising early life reproduction, facilitating their colonisation and population establishment, a process already completed in the high-density population.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Britton, J.R., Davies, G.D. and Brazier, M.

Journal: Journal of Applied Ichthyology

Volume: 24

Issue: 6

Pages: 694-698

eISSN: 1439-0426

ISSN: 0175-8659

DOI: 10.1111/j.1439-0426.2008.01163.x

Two topmouth gudgeon Pseudorasbora parva populations were studied in adjacent ponds in Northwest England to determine the influence of density on the expression of their life history traits. Initial introduction into one of these ponds had been in 2000, with establishment of an abundant population (density in March 2005: 6.1 ± 3.2 m-2). Their transfer into the adjacent pond only occurred during brief periods of seasonal connection; this population was of low abundance (density in March 2005: 0.6 ± 0.5 m -2) and was still colonising the pond at the time of sampling. In the low-density population, individuals were significantly faster growing, maturing earlier (generally in their first year of life) and more fecund at length and age (mean batch fecundity at 50 mm: 883 compared with 473 eggs). These traits were advantageous in maximising early life reproduction, facilitating their colonisation and population establishment, a process already completed in the high-density population. © 2008 The Authors.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Britton, J.R., Davies, G.D. and Brazier, M.

Journal: JOURNAL OF APPLIED ICHTHYOLOGY

Volume: 24

Issue: 6

Pages: 694-698

ISSN: 0175-8659

DOI: 10.1111/j.1439-0426.2008.01163.x

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