Reference data for evaluating the growth of common riverine fishes in the UK

This source preferred by Robert Britton

Authors: Britton, J.R.

http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/118532845/abstract

Journal: Journal of Applied Ichthyology

Volume: 23

Pages: 555-560

ISSN: 0175-8659

DOI: 10.1111/j.1439-0426.2007.00845.x

Comparative assessments of population mean growth rates in length remain important aspects of stock assessment in river fisheries. To facilitate these assessments, for 15 fish species encountered in UK rivers reference data are provided on their expected lengths at age, maximum theoretical lengths (L∞), growth coefficient (K) and instantaneous mortality rate (Z). These data are also transferable to fish populations outside of the UK that experience a similar growth season (approximately April to October, mean water temperatures 12–22°C). Considerable plasticity was observed in the growth of all species examined, with length at age values revealing growth rates from very slow to very fast. Populations considered fast growing against reference data were coincident with a relatively low ultimate length, a high growth coefficient and a high instantaneous mortality rate, suggesting a trade-off exists between growth rate, ultimate length and life span.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Britton, J.R.

Journal: Journal of Applied Ichthyology

Volume: 23

Issue: 5

Pages: 555-560

eISSN: 1439-0426

ISSN: 0175-8659

DOI: 10.1111/j.1439-0426.2007.00845.x

Summary Comparative assessments of population mean growth rates in length remain important aspects of stock assessment in river fisheries. To facilitate these assessments, for 15 fish species encountered in UK rivers reference data are provided on their expected lengths at age, maximum theoretical lengths (L∞), growth coefficient (K) and instantaneous mortality rate (Z). These data are also transferable to fish populations outside of the UK that experience a similar growth season (approximately April to October, mean water temperatures 12-22°C). Considerable plasticity was observed in the growth of all species examined, with length at age values revealing growth rates from very slow to very fast. Populations considered fast growing against reference data were coincident with a relatively low ultimate length, a high growth coefficient and a high instantaneous mortality rate, suggesting a trade-off exists between growth rate, ultimate length and life span. © 2007 Blackwell Verlag.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Britton, J.R.

Journal: JOURNAL OF APPLIED ICHTHYOLOGY

Volume: 23

Issue: 5

Pages: 555-560

eISSN: 1439-0426

ISSN: 0175-8659

DOI: 10.1111/j.1439-0426.2007.00845.x

The data on this page was last updated at 04:55 on June 16, 2019.