The effect of subjective fish scale ageing on growth and recruitment analyses: A case study from the UK

This source preferred by Robert Britton

Authors: Musk, R., Britton, J.R. and Axford, S.N.

http://www.aiep.pl/volumes/2000/6_1/pdf/12.pdf

Journal: Acta Ichthyologica et Piscatoria

Volume: 36

Pages: 81-84

ISSN: 0137-1592

Re-ageing of scales sampled in 1985 from the population of roach, Rutilus rutilus (L.), of the River Stour, England, revealed a high degree of subjectivity in their ageing, resulting from contrasting interpretations of similar scale features between practitioners. Compared with ages attained in 1985, re-ageing of the scales in 2004 only found agreement >80% at ages 1, 2, and 4 years. By age 9, agreement had dropped to 6%. The re-ageing revealed the presence of year classes that had previously been thought to have already died out and suggested their recruitment strength was associated with water temperatures in the first year of life of cohorts.

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Authors: Musk, R.S., Britton, J.R. and Axford, S.N.

Journal: Acta Ichthyologica et Piscatoria

Volume: 36

Issue: 1

Pages: 81-84

eISSN: 1734-1515

ISSN: 0137-1592

DOI: 10.3750/AIP2006.36.1.12

Re-ageing of scales sampled in 1985 from the population of roach, Rutilus rutilus (L.), of the River Stour, England, revealed a high degree of subjectivity in their ageing, resulting from contrasting interpretations of similar scale features between practitioners. Compared with ages attained in 1985, re-ageing of the scales in 2004 only found agreement >80% at ages 1, 2, and 4 years. By age 9, agreement had dropped to 6%. The re-ageing revealed the presence of year classes that had previously been thought to have already died out and suggested their recruitment strength was associated with water temperatures in the first year of life of cohorts.

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