Research frameworks for World Heritage Sites and the conceptualization of archaeological knowledge

This source preferred by Timothy Darvill

Authors: Darvill, T.

http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content~db=all?content=10.1080/00438240701464970

Journal: World Archaeology

Volume: 39

Pages: 436-457

ISSN: 0043-8243

DOI: 10.1080/00438240701464970

Research has a central place in the identification and definition of World Heritage Sites, and increasingly in their ongoing management and conservation. Using the example of Stonehenge in central southern England, attention is drawn to the formulation of a research framework as a means of providing a transparent and structured approach to the planning and execution of high quality research. Ultimately, however, research has to be useful and socially relevant in terms of the outputs produced. In the second part of the paper some of the wider issues of knowledge creation are explored and a scheme proposed for the conceptualization of archaeological knowledge or scientia as four overlapping fields: narrative knowledge, strategic knowledge, indigenous knowledge and contemplative knowledge. It is suggested that World Heritage Sites should not only be exemplary situations for the pursuit of research but also be closely identified with the creation and maintenance of different kinds of knowledge.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Darvill, T.

Journal: World Archaeology

Volume: 39

Issue: 3

Pages: 436-457

eISSN: 1470-1375

ISSN: 0043-8243

DOI: 10.1080/00438240701464970

Research has a central place in the identification and definition of World Heritage Sites, and increasingly in their ongoing management and conservation. Using the example of Stonehenge in central southern England, attention is drawn to the formulation of a research framework as a means of providing a transparent and structured approach to the planning and execution of high quality research. Ultimately, however, research has to be useful and socially relevant in terms of the outputs produced. In the second part of the paper some of the wider issues of knowledge creation are explored and a scheme proposed for the conceptualization of archaeological knowledge or scientia as four overlapping fields: narrative knowledge, strategic knowledge, indigenous knowledge and contemplative knowledge. It is suggested that World Heritage Sites should not only be exemplary situations for the pursuit of research but also be closely identified with the creation and maintenance of different kinds of knowledge.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Darvill, T.

Journal: WORLD ARCHAEOLOGY

Volume: 39

Issue: 3

Pages: 436-457

eISSN: 1470-1375

ISSN: 0043-8243

DOI: 10.1080/00438240701464970

The data on this page was last updated at 05:17 on April 2, 2020.