Fear of Missing Out (FoMO) as Really Lived: Five Classifications and one Ecology

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Authors: Alutaybi, A., McAlaney, J., Arden-Close, E., Stefanidis, A., Phalp, K. and Ali, R.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32658/

https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpl/conhome/8952729/proceeding

Journal: BESC

Pages: 1-6

Publisher: IEEE

ISBN: 978-1-7281-4762-8

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Alutaybi, A., McAlaney, J., Arden-Close, E., Stefanidis, A., Phalp, K. and Ali, R.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32658/

Journal: BESC 2019 - 6th International Conference on Behavioral, Economic and Socio-Cultural Computing, Proceedings

ISBN: 9781728147628

DOI: 10.1109/BESC48373.2019.8963027

© 2019 IEEE. Social media provides a platform for information sharing and dissemination and has speedily become a popular method for individuals to relate to others regardless of the time and geographical distance. However, this wealth of connectivity and availability of information may lead to the experience of the Fear of Missing Out (FoMO) that typically refers to a preoccupation of the users of social media about lost opportunities when they are offline or unable to connect and communicate as wished. Despite the recognition of the concept, studies around FoMO have used offline data collection techniques such as interviews, focus groups and surveys. This has led to a limited understanding of the lived FoMO experience and a rather simplified and coarse-grained view of the concept. In this paper, we delve into the specifics and nuances of FoMO through multi-stage qualitative research, including interviews, diary study and three focus group sessions and elaborate upon the concept and determine its various manifestations and classification. The lived experience is mainly gathered through a diary study. We present five main classifications characterising FoMO and develop an ecology for it.

The data on this page was last updated at 05:19 on April 6, 2020.