Perceptions of Interactive, Real-Time Persuasive Technology for Managing Online Gambling

Authors: Arden-Close, E., Bolat, E., Vuillier, L. and Ali, R.

Journal: Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)

Volume: 13213 LNCS

Pages: 28-42

eISSN: 1611-3349

ISBN: 9783030984373

ISSN: 0302-9743

DOI: 10.1007/978-3-030-98438-0_3

Abstract:

Background: Interactive persuasive techniques, supported by the ability to retrieve real-time behaviour and other contextual data, offer an unprecedented opportunity to manage online activity. An example is Responsible Gambling (RG) tools. Currently, despite vast potential, they do not make use of real time gambling behaviour data, whether captured by operators (device, location, bets, limits set) or self-reported (finance, emotion, online browsing history). To design useful interactive persuasive tools, it is important to understand users’ perceptions to ensure maximum acceptance. Aims: Explore gamblers’ perceptions of the potential of future online platforms in providing data-driven, real-time, persuasive interventions for supporting responsible online gambling. Method: Qualitative semi-structured interviews conducted with 22 gamblers (80% men; 15 ex-problem, 7 current), regarding perceptions of the potential of persuasive techniques. Results: Thematic analysis showed participants were positive about data-driven, real-time, interactive technology for (i) providing information (educational, personal and comparative), (ii) limiting gambling (time and money spent, access to gambling operators) and (iii) providing support to gamblers (advice, feedback and context sensing). The technology was identified as most appropriate for low to moderate gamblers. Conclusions: Participants were positive about the new data access, techniques and modalities of interactions for supporting responsible online gambling. To ensure maximum reach and acceptability, such technology should be customised to fit individual profiles. Personalisation and tailoring of content, interactivity, framing and timing are necessary to enhance acceptance of such technology and avoid reactance, unintended harm, inconvenience, and information overload.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/36868/

Source: Scopus

Perceptions of Interactive, Real-Time Persuasive Technology for Managing Online Gambling

Authors: Arden-Close, E., Bolat, E., Vuillier, L. and Ali, R.

Journal: PERSUASIVE TECHNOLOGY (PERSUASIVE 2022)

Volume: 13213

Pages: 28-42

eISSN: 1611-3349

ISBN: 978-3-030-98437-3

ISSN: 0302-9743

DOI: 10.1007/978-3-030-98438-0_3

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/36868/

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

Perceptions of Interactive, Real-Time Persuasive Technology for Managing Online Gambling

Authors: Arden-Close, E., Bolat, E., Vuillier, L. and Ali, R.

Conference: Persuasive 22: International Conference on Persuasive Technology

Volume: 13213

Pages: 28-42

ISBN: 9783030984373

ISSN: 0302-9743

Abstract:

Background: Interactive persuasive techniques, supported by the ability to retrieve real-time behaviour and other contextual data, offer an unprecedented opportunity to manage online activity. An example is Responsible Gambling (RG) tools. Currently, despite vast potential, they do not make use of real time gambling behaviour data, whether captured by operators (device, location, bets, limits set) or self-reported (finance, emotion, online browsing history). To design useful interactive persuasive tools, it is important to understand users’ perceptions to ensure maximum acceptance. Aims: Explore gamblers’ perceptions of the potential of future online platforms in providing data-driven, real-time, persuasive interventions for supporting responsible online gambling. Method: Qualitative semi-structured interviews conducted with 22 gamblers (80% men; 15 ex-problem, 7 current), regarding perceptions of the potential of persuasive techniques. Results: Thematic analysis showed participants were positive about data-driven, real-time, interactive technology for (i) providing information (educational, personal and comparative), (ii) limiting gambling (time and money spent, access to gambling operators) and (iii) providing support to gamblers (advice, feedback and context sensing). The technology was identified as most appropriate for low to moderate gamblers. Conclusions: Participants were positive about the new data access, techniques and modalities of interactions for supporting responsible online gambling. To ensure maximum reach and acceptability, such technology should be customised to fit individual profiles. Personalisation and tailoring of content, interactivity, framing and timing are necessary to enhance acceptance of such technology and avoid reactance, unintended harm, inconvenience, and information overload.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/36868/

Source: BURO EPrints