Surfing the net for public health resources

This source preferred by Catherine Angell, Heather Hartwell and Ann Hemingway

Authors: Angell, C., Hemingway, A. and Hartwell, H.

Journal: Public Health

Volume: 125

Pages: 547-553

ISSN: 0033-3506

DOI: 10.1016/j.puhe.2011.02.007

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Angell, C., Hemingway, A. and Hartwell, H.

Journal: Public Health

Volume: 125

Issue: 8

Pages: 547-553

eISSN: 1476-5616

DOI: 10.1016/j.puhe.2011.02.007

OBJECTIVES: To identify public health open educational resources (OER) available online, map the identified OER to The Public Health Skills and Career Framework (PHSCF), and triangulate these findings with public health practitioners. STUDY DESIGN: Systematic online search for public health OER. METHODS: An online search was undertaken using a pre-defined set of search terms and inclusion/exclusion criteria. Public health OER were then mapped against the UK PHSCF. The findings of the search were discussed with public health specialists to determine whether or not they used these resources. RESULTS: A number of public health OER were identified, located on 42 websites from around the world. Mapping against the UK PHSCF demonstrated a lack of coverage in some areas of public health education. It was noted that many of the OER websites identified were not those generally used in practice, and those sites preferred by public health specialists were not identified by the online search. CONCLUSIONS: Public health OER are available from a number of providers, frequently universities and government organizations. However, these reflect a relatively small pool of original OER providers. Tagging of websites does not always identify their public health content. In addition, users of public health OER may not use search engines to identify resources but locate them using other means.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Angell, C., Hemingway, A. and Hartwell, H.

Journal: Public Health

Volume: 125

Issue: 8

Pages: 547-553

eISSN: 1476-5616

ISSN: 0033-3506

DOI: 10.1016/j.puhe.2011.02.007

Objectives: To identify public health open educational resources (OER) available online, map the identified OER to The Public Health Skills and Career Framework (PHSCF), and triangulate these findings with public health practitioners. Study design: Systematic online search for public health OER. Methods: An online search was undertaken using a pre-defined set of search terms and inclusion/exclusion criteria. Public health OER were then mapped against the UK PHSCF. The findings of the search were discussed with public health specialists to determine whether or not they used these resources. Results: A number of public health OER were identified, located on 42 websites from around the world. Mapping against the UK PHSCF demonstrated a lack of coverage in some areas of public health education. It was noted that many of the OER websites identified were not those generally used in practice, and those sites preferred by public health specialists were not identified by the online search. Conclusions: Public health OER are available from a number of providers, frequently universities and government organizations. However, these reflect a relatively small pool of original OER providers. Tagging of websites does not always identify their public health content. In addition, users of public health OER may not use search engines to identify resources but locate them using other means. © 2011 The Royal Society for Public Health.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Angell, C., Hemingway, A. and Hartwell, H.

Journal: PUBLIC HEALTH

Volume: 125

Issue: 8

Pages: 547-553

ISSN: 0033-3506

DOI: 10.1016/j.puhe.2011.02.007

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Angell, C., Hemingway, A. and Hartwell, H.

Journal: Public health

Volume: 125

Issue: 8

Pages: 547-553

eISSN: 1476-5616

ISSN: 0033-3506

OBJECTIVES: To identify public health open educational resources (OER) available online, map the identified OER to The Public Health Skills and Career Framework (PHSCF), and triangulate these findings with public health practitioners. STUDY DESIGN: Systematic online search for public health OER. METHODS: An online search was undertaken using a pre-defined set of search terms and inclusion/exclusion criteria. Public health OER were then mapped against the UK PHSCF. The findings of the search were discussed with public health specialists to determine whether or not they used these resources. RESULTS: A number of public health OER were identified, located on 42 websites from around the world. Mapping against the UK PHSCF demonstrated a lack of coverage in some areas of public health education. It was noted that many of the OER websites identified were not those generally used in practice, and those sites preferred by public health specialists were not identified by the online search. CONCLUSIONS: Public health OER are available from a number of providers, frequently universities and government organizations. However, these reflect a relatively small pool of original OER providers. Tagging of websites does not always identify their public health content. In addition, users of public health OER may not use search engines to identify resources but locate them using other means.

The data on this page was last updated at 05:22 on November 24, 2020.