Temporal changes in growth, condition and trophic niche in juvenile Cyprinus carpio infected with a non-native parasite

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Pegg, J., Andreou, D., Williams, C.F. and Britton, J.R.

Journal: Parasitology

Volume: 142

Issue: 13

Pages: 1579-1587

eISSN: 1469-8161

DOI: 10.1017/S0031182015001237

In host-parasite relationships, parasite prevalence and abundance can vary over time, potentially impacting how hosts are affected by infection. Here, the pathology, growth, condition and diet of a juvenile Cyprinus carpio cohort infected with the non-native cestode Bothriocephalus acheilognathi was measured in October 2012 (end of their first summer of life), April 2013 (end of first winter) and October 2013 (end of second summer). Pathology revealed consistent impacts, including severe compression and architectural modification of the intestine. At the end of the first summer, there was no difference in lengths and condition of the infected and uninfected fish. However, at the end of the winter period, the condition of infected fish was significantly reduced and by the end of their second summer, the infected fish were significantly smaller and remained in significantly reduced condition. Their diets were significantly different over time; infected fish consumed significantly higher proportions of food items <53 µm than uninfected individuals, a likely consequence of impaired functional traits due to infection. Thus, the sub-lethal impacts of this parasite, namely changes in histopathology, growth and trophic niche were dependent on time and/or age of the fish.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Pegg, J., Andreou, D., Williams, C.F. and Britton, J.R.

Journal: Parasitology

Volume: 142

Issue: 13

Pages: 1579-1587

eISSN: 1469-8161

ISSN: 0031-1820

DOI: 10.1017/S0031182015001237

© 2015 Cambridge University Press. In host-parasite relationships, parasite prevalence and abundance can vary over time, potentially impacting how hosts are affected by infection. Here, the pathology, growth, condition and diet of a juvenile Cyprinus carpio cohort infected with the non-native cestode Bothriocephalus acheilognathi was measured in October 2012 (end of their first summer of life), April 2013 (end of first winter) and October 2013 (end of second summer). Pathology revealed consistent impacts, including severe compression and architectural modification of the intestine. At the end of the first summer, there was no difference in lengths and condition of the infected and uninfected fish. However, at the end of the winter period, the condition of infected fish was significantly reduced and by the end of their second summer, the infected fish were significantly smaller and remained in significantly reduced condition. Their diets were significantly different over time; infected fish consumed significantly higher proportions of food items <53 μm than uninfected individuals, a likely consequence of impaired functional traits due to infection. Thus, the sub-lethal impacts of this parasite, namely changes in histopathology, growth and trophic niche were dependent on time and/or age of the fish.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: PEGG, J., ANDREOU, D., WILLIAMS, C.F. and BRITTON, J.R.

Journal: Parasitology

eISSN: 1469-8161

ISSN: 0031-1820

DOI: 10.1017/S0031182015001237

Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2015In host–parasite relationships, parasite prevalence and abundance can vary over time, potentially impacting how hosts are affected by infection. Here, the pathology, growth, condition and diet of a juvenile Cyprinus carpio cohort infected with the non-native cestode Bothriocephalus acheilognathi was measured in October 2012 (end of their first summer of life), April 2013 (end of first winter) and October 2013 (end of second summer). Pathology revealed consistent impacts, including severe compression and architectural modification of the intestine. At the end of the first summer, there was no difference in lengths and condition of the infected and uninfected fish. However, at the end of the winter period, the condition of infected fish was significantly reduced and by the end of their second summer, the infected fish were significantly smaller and remained in significantly reduced condition. Their diets were significantly different over time; infected fish consumed significantly higher proportions of food items <53 µm than uninfected individuals, a likely consequence of impaired functional traits due to infection. Thus, the sub-lethal impacts of this parasite, namely changes in histopathology, growth and trophic niche were dependent on time and/or age of the fish.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Pegg, J., Andreou, D., Williams, C.F. and Britton, J.R.

Journal: PARASITOLOGY

Volume: 142

Issue: 13

Pages: 1579-1587

eISSN: 1469-8161

ISSN: 0031-1820

DOI: 10.1017/S0031182015001237

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Pegg, J., Andreou, D., Williams, C.F. and Britton, J.R.

Journal: Parasitology

Volume: 142

Issue: 13

Pages: 1579-1587

eISSN: 1469-8161

ISSN: 0031-1820

In host-parasite relationships, parasite prevalence and abundance can vary over time, potentially impacting how hosts are affected by infection. Here, the pathology, growth, condition and diet of a juvenile Cyprinus carpio cohort infected with the non-native cestode Bothriocephalus acheilognathi was measured in October 2012 (end of their first summer of life), April 2013 (end of first winter) and October 2013 (end of second summer). Pathology revealed consistent impacts, including severe compression and architectural modification of the intestine. At the end of the first summer, there was no difference in lengths and condition of the infected and uninfected fish. However, at the end of the winter period, the condition of infected fish was significantly reduced and by the end of their second summer, the infected fish were significantly smaller and remained in significantly reduced condition. Their diets were significantly different over time; infected fish consumed significantly higher proportions of food items <53 µm than uninfected individuals, a likely consequence of impaired functional traits due to infection. Thus, the sub-lethal impacts of this parasite, namely changes in histopathology, growth and trophic niche were dependent on time and/or age of the fish.

The data on this page was last updated at 04:57 on June 24, 2019.