Increasing vegetable intakes: rationale and systematic review of published interventions

Authors: Appleton, K.M., Hemingway, A., Saulais, L., Dinnella, C., Monteleone, E., Depezay, L., Morizet, D., Armando Perez-Cueto, F.J., Bevan, A. and Hartwell, H.

Journal: European Journal of Nutrition

Volume: 55

Issue: 3

Pages: 869-896

eISSN: 1436-6215

ISSN: 1436-6207

DOI: 10.1007/s00394-015-1130-8

Abstract:

Purpose: While the health benefits of a high fruit and vegetable consumption are well known and considerable work has attempted to improve intakes, increasing evidence also recognises a distinction between fruit and vegetables, both in their impacts on health and in consumption patterns. Increasing work suggests health benefits from a high consumption specifically of vegetables, yet intakes remain low, and barriers to increasing intakes are prevalent making intervention difficult. A systematic review was undertaken to identify from the published literature all studies reporting an intervention to increase intakes of vegetables as a distinct food group. Methods: Databases—PubMed, PsychInfo and Medline—were searched over all years of records until April 2015 using pre-specified terms. Results: Our searches identified 77 studies, detailing 140 interventions, of which 133 (81 %) interventions were conducted in children. Interventions aimed to use or change hedonic factors, such as taste, liking and familiarity (n = 72), use or change environmental factors (n = 39), use or change cognitive factors (n = 19), or a combination of strategies (n = 10). Increased vegetable acceptance, selection and/or consumption were reported to some degree in 116 (83 %) interventions, but the majority of effects seem small and inconsistent. Conclusions: Greater percent success is currently found from environmental, educational and multi-component interventions, but publication bias is likely, and long-term effects and cost-effectiveness are rarely considered. A focus on long-term benefits and sustained behaviour change is required. Certain population groups are also noticeably absent from the current list of tried interventions.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/23220/

Source: Scopus

Increasing vegetable intakes: rationale and systematic review of published interventions.

Authors: Appleton, K.M., Hemingway, A., Saulais, L., Dinnella, C., Monteleone, E., Depezay, L., Morizet, D., Armando Perez-Cueto, F.J., Bevan, A. and Hartwell, H.

Journal: Eur J Nutr

Volume: 55

Issue: 3

Pages: 869-896

eISSN: 1436-6215

DOI: 10.1007/s00394-015-1130-8

Abstract:

PURPOSE: While the health benefits of a high fruit and vegetable consumption are well known and considerable work has attempted to improve intakes, increasing evidence also recognises a distinction between fruit and vegetables, both in their impacts on health and in consumption patterns. Increasing work suggests health benefits from a high consumption specifically of vegetables, yet intakes remain low, and barriers to increasing intakes are prevalent making intervention difficult. A systematic review was undertaken to identify from the published literature all studies reporting an intervention to increase intakes of vegetables as a distinct food group. METHODS: Databases-PubMed, PsychInfo and Medline-were searched over all years of records until April 2015 using pre-specified terms. RESULTS: Our searches identified 77 studies, detailing 140 interventions, of which 133 (81 %) interventions were conducted in children. Interventions aimed to use or change hedonic factors, such as taste, liking and familiarity (n = 72), use or change environmental factors (n = 39), use or change cognitive factors (n = 19), or a combination of strategies (n = 10). Increased vegetable acceptance, selection and/or consumption were reported to some degree in 116 (83 %) interventions, but the majority of effects seem small and inconsistent. CONCLUSIONS: Greater percent success is currently found from environmental, educational and multi-component interventions, but publication bias is likely, and long-term effects and cost-effectiveness are rarely considered. A focus on long-term benefits and sustained behaviour change is required. Certain population groups are also noticeably absent from the current list of tried interventions.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/23220/

Source: PubMed

Increasing vegetable intakes: rationale and systematic review of published interventions

Authors: Appleton, K.M., Hemingway, A., Saulais, L., Dinnella, C., Monteleone, E., Depezay, L., Morizet, D., Perez-Cueto, F.J.A., Bevan, A. and Hartwell, H.

Journal: EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF NUTRITION

Volume: 55

Issue: 3

Pages: 869-896

eISSN: 1436-6215

ISSN: 1436-6207

DOI: 10.1007/s00394-015-1130-8

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/23220/

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

Increasing vegetable intakes: rationale and systematic review of published interventions

Authors: Appleton, K.M., Hemingway, A., Saulais, L., Dinnella, C., Monteleone, E., Depezay, L., Morizet, D., Perez‑Cueto, F.J.A., Bevan, A. and Hartwell, H.

Journal: European Journal of Nutrition

ISSN: 1436-6215

DOI: 10.1007/s00394-015-1130-8

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/23220/

Source: Manual

Increasing vegetable intakes: rationale and systematic review of published interventions.

Authors: Appleton, K.M., Hemingway, A., Saulais, L., Dinnella, C., Monteleone, E., Depezay, L., Morizet, D., Armando Perez-Cueto, F.J., Bevan, A. and Hartwell, H.

Journal: European journal of nutrition

Volume: 55

Issue: 3

Pages: 869-896

eISSN: 1436-6215

ISSN: 1436-6207

DOI: 10.1007/s00394-015-1130-8

Abstract:

Purpose

While the health benefits of a high fruit and vegetable consumption are well known and considerable work has attempted to improve intakes, increasing evidence also recognises a distinction between fruit and vegetables, both in their impacts on health and in consumption patterns. Increasing work suggests health benefits from a high consumption specifically of vegetables, yet intakes remain low, and barriers to increasing intakes are prevalent making intervention difficult. A systematic review was undertaken to identify from the published literature all studies reporting an intervention to increase intakes of vegetables as a distinct food group.

Methods

Databases-PubMed, PsychInfo and Medline-were searched over all years of records until April 2015 using pre-specified terms.

Results

Our searches identified 77 studies, detailing 140 interventions, of which 133 (81 %) interventions were conducted in children. Interventions aimed to use or change hedonic factors, such as taste, liking and familiarity (n = 72), use or change environmental factors (n = 39), use or change cognitive factors (n = 19), or a combination of strategies (n = 10). Increased vegetable acceptance, selection and/or consumption were reported to some degree in 116 (83 %) interventions, but the majority of effects seem small and inconsistent.

Conclusions

Greater percent success is currently found from environmental, educational and multi-component interventions, but publication bias is likely, and long-term effects and cost-effectiveness are rarely considered. A focus on long-term benefits and sustained behaviour change is required. Certain population groups are also noticeably absent from the current list of tried interventions.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/23220/

Source: Europe PubMed Central