Promoting sexual well-being in social work education and practice

Authors: Lee, S., Fenge, L.A. and Collins, B.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/29951/

Journal: Social Work Education

Publisher: Joint University Council, Social Work Education Committee, Royal Institute of Public Administration

ISSN: 0261-5479

DOI: 10.1080/02615479.2017.1401602

This paper explores the importance of including sexual well-being within social work practice and education. Social workers often work with individuals for whom opportunities for sexual expression are limited and who face discriminatory attitudes. Sexual well-being is a global concern, and is particularly relevant considering international interest in the influence of notions of well-being on mental and physical health. Implementation of new social care policy in England, underpinned by the well-being principle, provides practitioners with the opportunity to explore what is meaningful to individual’s well-being through person-centred approaches to practice. There is currently little coverage of sexual well-being within social work education, this means students and practitioners lack the knowledge and skills to challenge barriers. Promotion of the concept of sexual citizenship, with its associated rights and responsibilities, enables social workers to engage in rights focused practice. Sexual well-being is a sensitive subject and the social and personal barriers practitioners may experience in addressing this topic are explored.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Lee, S., Fenge, L.A. and Collins, B.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/29951/

Journal: Social Work Education

Volume: 37

Issue: 3

Pages: 315-327

eISSN: 1470-1227

ISSN: 0261-5479

DOI: 10.1080/02615479.2017.1401602

© 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. This paper explores the importance of including sexual well-being within social work practice and education. Social workers often work with individuals for whom opportunities for sexual expression are limited and who face discriminatory attitudes. Sexual well-being is a global concern, and is particularly relevant considering international interest in the influence of notions of well-being on mental and physical health. Implementation of new social care policy in England, underpinned by the well-being principle, provides practitioners with the opportunity to explore what is meaningful to individual’s well-being through person-centred approaches to practice. There is currently little coverage of sexual well-being within social work education, this means students and practitioners lack the knowledge and skills to challenge barriers. Promotion of the concept of sexual citizenship, with its associated rights and responsibilities, enables social workers to engage in rights focused practice. Sexual well-being is a sensitive subject and the social and personal barriers practitioners may experience in addressing this topic are explored.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Lee, S., Fenge, L.-A. and Collins, B.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/29951/

Journal: SOCIAL WORK EDUCATION

Volume: 37

Issue: 3

Pages: 315-327

eISSN: 1470-1227

ISSN: 0261-5479

DOI: 10.1080/02615479.2017.1401602

The data on this page was last updated at 04:53 on March 24, 2019.