Does social presence or the potential for interaction reduce social gaze in online social scenarios? Introducing the “live lab” paradigm

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Gregory, N.J. and Antolin, J.V.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/30611/

Journal: Q J Exp Psychol (Hove)

Volume: 72

Issue: 4

Pages: 779-791

eISSN: 1747-0226

DOI: 10.1177/1747021818772812

Research has shown that people's gaze is biased away from faces in the real world but towards them when they are viewed onscreen. Non-equivalent stimulus conditions may have represented a confound in this research, however, as participants viewed onscreen stimuli as pre-recordings where interaction was not possible compared with real-world stimuli which were viewed in real time where interaction was possible. We assessed the independent contributions of online social presence and ability for interaction on social gaze by developing the "live lab" paradigm. Participants in three groups ( N = 132) viewed a confederate as (1) a live webcam stream where interaction was not possible (one-way), (2) a live webcam stream where an interaction was possible (two-way), or (3) a pre-recording. Potential for interaction, rather than online social presence, was the primary influence on gaze behaviour: participants in the pre-recorded and one-way conditions looked more to the face than those in the two-way condition, particularly, when the confederate made "eye contact." Fixation durations to the face were shorter when the scene was viewed live, particularly, during a bid for eye contact. Our findings support the dual function of gaze but suggest that online social presence alone is not sufficient to activate social norms of civil inattention. Implications for the reinterpretation of previous research are discussed.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Gregory, N.J. and Antolin, J.V.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/30611/

Journal: Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology

Volume: 72

Issue: 4

Pages: 779-791

eISSN: 1747-0226

ISSN: 1747-0218

DOI: 10.1177/1747021818772812

© Experimental Psychology Society 2018. Research has shown that people’s gaze is biased away from faces in the real world but towards them when they are viewed onscreen. Non-equivalent stimulus conditions may have represented a confound in this research, however, as participants viewed onscreen stimuli as pre-recordings where interaction was not possible compared with real-world stimuli which were viewed in real time where interaction was possible. We assessed the independent contributions of online social presence and ability for interaction on social gaze by developing the “live lab” paradigm. Participants in three groups (N = 132) viewed a confederate as (1) a live webcam stream where interaction was not possible (one-way), (2) a live webcam stream where an interaction was possible (two-way), or (3) a pre-recording. Potential for interaction, rather than online social presence, was the primary influence on gaze behaviour: participants in the pre-recorded and one-way conditions looked more to the face than those in the two-way condition, particularly, when the confederate made “eye contact.” Fixation durations to the face were shorter when the scene was viewed live, particularly, during a bid for eye contact. Our findings support the dual function of gaze but suggest that online social presence alone is not sufficient to activate social norms of civil inattention. Implications for the reinterpretation of previous research are discussed.

The data on this page was last updated at 05:16 on April 4, 2020.