Objective patterns of face recognition deficits in 165 adults with self-reported developmental prosopagnosia

Authors: Bate, S., Bennetts, R.J., Gregory, N., Tree, J.J., Murray, E., Adams, A., Bobak, A.K., Penton, T., Yang, T. and Banissy, M.J.

Journal: Brain Sciences

Volume: 9

Issue: 6

eISSN: 2076-3425

DOI: 10.3390/brainsci9060133

Abstract:

In the last 15 years, increasing numbers of individuals have self-referred to research laboratories in the belief that they experience severe everyday difficulties with face recognition. The condition “developmental prosopagnosia” (DP) is typically diagnosed when impairment is identified on at least two objective face-processing tests, usually involving assessments of face perception, unfamiliar face memory, and famous face recognition. While existing evidence suggests that some individuals may have a mnemonic form of prosopagnosia, it is also possible that other subtypes exist. The current study assessed 165 adults who believe they experience DP, and 38% of the sample were impaired on at least two of the tests outlined above. While statistical dissociations between face perception and face memory were only observed in four cases, a further 25% of the sample displayed dissociations between impaired famous face recognition and intact short-term unfamiliar face memory and face perception. We discuss whether this pattern of findings reflects (a) limitations within dominant diagnostic tests and protocols, (b) a less severe form of DP, or (c) a currently unrecognized but prevalent form of the condition that affects long-term face memory, familiar face recognition or semantic processing.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32401/

Source: Scopus

Objective Patterns of Face Recognition Deficits in 165 Adults with Self-Reported Developmental Prosopagnosia.

Authors: Bate, S., Bennetts, R.J., Gregory, N., Tree, J.J., Murray, E., Adams, A., Bobak, A.K., Penton, T., Yang, T. and Banissy, M.J.

Journal: Brain Sci

Volume: 9

Issue: 6

ISSN: 2076-3425

DOI: 10.3390/brainsci9060133

Abstract:

In the last 15 years, increasing numbers of individuals have self-referred to research laboratories in the belief that they experience severe everyday difficulties with face recognition. The condition "developmental prosopagnosia" (DP) is typically diagnosed when impairment is identified on at least two objective face-processing tests, usually involving assessments of face perception, unfamiliar face memory, and famous face recognition. While existing evidence suggests that some individuals may have a mnemonic form of prosopagnosia, it is also possible that other subtypes exist. The current study assessed 165 adults who believe they experience DP, and 38% of the sample were impaired on at least two of the tests outlined above. While statistical dissociations between face perception and face memory were only observed in four cases, a further 25% of the sample displayed dissociations between impaired famous face recognition and intact short-term unfamiliar face memory and face perception. We discuss whether this pattern of findings reflects (a) limitations within dominant diagnostic tests and protocols, (b) a less severe form of DP, or (c) a currently unrecognized but prevalent form of the condition that affects long-term face memory, familiar face recognition or semantic processing.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32401/

Source: PubMed

Objective Patterns of Face Recognition Deficits in 165 Adults with Self-Reported Developmental Prosopagnosia

Authors: Bate, S., Bennetts, R.J., Gregory, N., Tree, J.J., Murray, E., Adams, A., Bobak, A.K., Penton, T., Yang, T. and Banissy, M.J.

Journal: BRAIN SCIENCES

Volume: 9

Issue: 6

eISSN: 2076-3425

DOI: 10.3390/brainsci9060133

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32401/

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

Objective Patterns of Face Recognition Deficits in 165 Adults with Self-Reported Developmental Prosopagnosia.

Authors: Bate, S., Bennetts, R.J., Gregory, N., Tree, J.J., Murray, E., Adams, A., Bobak, A.K., Penton, T., Yang, T. and Banissy, M.J.

Journal: Brain sciences

Volume: 9

Issue: 6

Pages: E133

eISSN: 2076-3425

ISSN: 2076-3425

DOI: 10.3390/brainsci9060133

Abstract:

In the last 15 years, increasing numbers of individuals have self-referred to research laboratories in the belief that they experience severe everyday difficulties with face recognition. The condition "developmental prosopagnosia" (DP) is typically diagnosed when impairment is identified on at least two objective face-processing tests, usually involving assessments of face perception, unfamiliar face memory, and famous face recognition. While existing evidence suggests that some individuals may have a mnemonic form of prosopagnosia, it is also possible that other subtypes exist. The current study assessed 165 adults who believe they experience DP, and 38% of the sample were impaired on at least two of the tests outlined above. While statistical dissociations between face perception and face memory were only observed in four cases, a further 25% of the sample displayed dissociations between impaired famous face recognition and intact short-term unfamiliar face memory and face perception. We discuss whether this pattern of findings reflects (a) limitations within dominant diagnostic tests and protocols, (b) a less severe form of DP, or (c) a currently unrecognized but prevalent form of the condition that affects long-term face memory, familiar face recognition or semantic processing.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32401/

Source: Europe PubMed Central

Objective Patterns of Face Recognition Deficits in 165 Adults with Self-Reported Developmental Prosopagnosia.

Authors: Bate, S., Bennetts, R., Gregory, N.J., Tree, J.J., Murray, E., Adams, A., Bobak, A.K., Penton, T., Yang, T. and Banissy, M.J.

Journal: Brain Sciences

Volume: 9

Issue: 6

ISSN: 2076-3425

Abstract:

In the last 15 years, increasing numbers of individuals have self-referred to research laboratories in the belief that they experience severe everyday difficulties with face recognition. The condition "developmental prosopagnosia" (DP) is typically diagnosed when impairment is identified on at least two objective face-processing tests, usually involving assessments of face perception, unfamiliar face memory, and famous face recognition. While existing evidence suggests that some individuals may have a mnemonic form of prosopagnosia, it is also possible that other subtypes exist. The current study assessed 165 adults who believe they experience DP, and 38% of the sample were impaired on at least two of the tests outlined above. While statistical dissociations between face perception and face memory were only observed in four cases, a further 25% of the sample displayed dissociations between impaired famous face recognition and intact short-term unfamiliar face memory and face perception. We discuss whether this pattern of findings reflects (a) limitations within dominant diagnostic tests and protocols, (b) a less severe form of DP, or (c) a currently unrecognized but prevalent form of the condition that affects long-term face memory, familiar face recognition or semantic processing.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/32401/

Source: BURO EPrints