Mirror, mirror on the wall: Shifting leader–follower power dynamics in a social media context

Authors: Gilani, P., Bolat, E., Nordberg, D. and Wilkin, C.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/33086/

Journal: Leadership

Publisher: SAGE

ISSN: 1742-7150

DOI: 10.1177/1742715019889817

The democratisation made possible by social media presents leadership studies with an opportunity to re-evaluate the often-neglected role of power in leader–follower dynamics. Drawing on Critical Leadership Studies and using a hybrid qualitative methodology, we discover that relationships between social media leaders and followers are co-produced and largely accompanied by continuous shifts and re-negotiation of power between social media leaders and social media followers. We show that social media platforms and their metrics play an important role in such power shifts by granting equal access to communication whilst potentially tilting information asymmetries in favour of the follower. The study also shows how these relationships can affect and even pervert the leaders’ problematic search for a ‘true self’. From this observation we draw attention to wider challenges in the social media context, which poses important questions for the leadership field.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Gilani, P., Bolat, E., Nordberg, D. and Wilkin, C.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/33086/

Journal: Leadership

eISSN: 1742-7169

ISSN: 1742-7150

DOI: 10.1177/1742715019889817

© The Author(s) 2019. The democratisation made possible by social media presents leadership studies with an opportunity to re-evaluate the often-neglected role of power in leader–follower dynamics. Drawing on Critical Leadership Studies and using a hybrid qualitative methodology, we discover that relationships between social media leaders and followers are co-produced and largely accompanied by continuous shifts and re-negotiation of power between social media leaders and social media followers. We show that social media platforms and their metrics play an important role in such power shifts by granting equal access to communication whilst potentially tilting information asymmetries in favour of the follower. The study also shows how these relationships can affect and even pervert the leaders’ problematic search for a ‘true self’. From this observation we draw attention to wider challenges in the social media context, which poses important questions for the leadership field.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Gilani, P., Bolat, E., Nordberg, D. and Wilkin, C.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/33086/

Journal: LEADERSHIP

eISSN: 1742-7169

ISSN: 1742-7150

DOI: 10.1177/1742715019889817

The data on this page was last updated at 05:17 on May 25, 2020.