Long-Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Lipid Peroxidation Products in Donor Human Milk in the United Kingdom: Results From the LIMIT 2-Centre Cross-Sectional Study

Authors: Nessel, I., De Rooy, L., Khashu, M., Murphy, J.L. and Dyall, S.C.

Journal: Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition

Volume: 44

Issue: 8

Pages: 1501-1509

eISSN: 1941-2444

ISSN: 0148-6071

DOI: 10.1002/jpen.1773

Abstract:

Background: Donor human milk (DHM) is used as alternative to maternal milk to feed preterm infants; however, it may provide less long-chain (LC) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and more oxidized lipids, which may be detrimental to preterm infant health and development. Levels have not been reported for DHM in the United Kingdom. Methods: DHM (n = 19) from 2 neonatal units, preterm milk from a neonatal unit (n = 10), and term milk from the community (n = 11) were analyzed for fatty acids, malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, and hexanal. Study registration: NCT03573531. Results: DHM had significantly lower absolute LCPUFA content than term (P <.001) and significantly lower ω-3 PUFAs than preterm milk (P <.05), although relative LCPUFA composition did not differ. Exclusive DHM feeding leads to significantly lower fat (3.7 vs 6.7 g/d) and LCPUFA (docosahexaenoic acid [DHA]: 10.6 vs 16.8 mg/d; arachidonic acid [ARA]: 17.4 vs 25.2 mg/d) intake than recommended by the European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, and provides 17.3% and 43.1% of the in utero accreted ARA and DHA. DHM had the highest proportion of lipid peroxidation. Conclusions: This study confirms that DHM in the United Kingdom has insufficient LCPUFAs for preterm infants. It demonstrates for the first time that DHM has the highest level of lipid peroxidation, compared with preterm or term milk. This has important implications for preterm infant nutrition, as exclusive DHM feeding might not be suitable long term and may contribute to the development of major preterm neonatal morbidities.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/33265/

Source: Scopus

Long-Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Lipid Peroxidation Products in Donor Human Milk in the United Kingdom: Results From the LIMIT 2-Centre Cross-Sectional Study.

Authors: Nessel, I., De Rooy, L., Khashu, M., Murphy, J.L. and Dyall, S.C.

Journal: JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr

Volume: 44

Issue: 8

Pages: 1501-1509

eISSN: 1941-2444

DOI: 10.1002/jpen.1773

Abstract:

BACKGROUND: Donor human milk (DHM) is used as alternative to maternal milk to feed preterm infants; however, it may provide less long-chain (LC) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and more oxidized lipids, which may be detrimental to preterm infant health and development. Levels have not been reported for DHM in the United Kingdom. METHODS: DHM (n = 19) from 2 neonatal units, preterm milk from a neonatal unit (n = 10), and term milk from the community (n = 11) were analyzed for fatty acids, malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, and hexanal. STUDY REGISTRATION: NCT03573531. RESULTS: DHM had significantly lower absolute LCPUFA content than term (P < .001) and significantly lower ω-3 PUFAs than preterm milk (P < .05), although relative LCPUFA composition did not differ. Exclusive DHM feeding leads to significantly lower fat (3.7 vs 6.7 g/d) and LCPUFA (docosahexaenoic acid [DHA]: 10.6 vs 16.8 mg/d; arachidonic acid [ARA]: 17.4 vs 25.2 mg/d) intake than recommended by the European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, and provides 17.3% and 43.1% of the in utero accreted ARA and DHA. DHM had the highest proportion of lipid peroxidation. CONCLUSIONS: This study confirms that DHM in the United Kingdom has insufficient LCPUFAs for preterm infants. It demonstrates for the first time that DHM has the highest level of lipid peroxidation, compared with preterm or term milk. This has important implications for preterm infant nutrition, as exclusive DHM feeding might not be suitable long term and may contribute to the development of major preterm neonatal morbidities.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/33265/

Source: PubMed

Long-Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Lipid Peroxidation Products in Donor Human Milk in the United Kingdom: Results From the LIMIT 2-Centre Cross-Sectional Study

Authors: Nessel, I., De Rooy, L., Khashu, M., Murphy, J.L. and Dyall, S.C.

Journal: JOURNAL OF PARENTERAL AND ENTERAL NUTRITION

Volume: 44

Issue: 8

Pages: 1501-1509

eISSN: 1941-2444

ISSN: 0148-6071

DOI: 10.1002/jpen.1773

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/33265/

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids and lipid peroxidation products in donor human milk in the U.K.: Results from the LIMIT two-centre cross sectional study. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition

Authors: Nessell, I., Rooy, L., Khashu, M., Murphy, J. and Dyall, S.C.

Journal: Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/33265/

Source: Manual

Long-Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Lipid Peroxidation Products in Donor Human Milk in the United Kingdom: Results From the LIMIT 2-Centre Cross-Sectional Study.

Authors: Nessel, I., De Rooy, L., Khashu, M., Murphy, J.L. and Dyall, S.C.

Journal: JPEN. Journal of parenteral and enteral nutrition

Volume: 44

Issue: 8

Pages: 1501-1509

eISSN: 1941-2444

ISSN: 0148-6071

DOI: 10.1002/jpen.1773

Abstract:

Background

Donor human milk (DHM) is used as alternative to maternal milk to feed preterm infants; however, it may provide less long-chain (LC) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and more oxidized lipids, which may be detrimental to preterm infant health and development. Levels have not been reported for DHM in the United Kingdom.

Methods

DHM (n = 19) from 2 neonatal units, preterm milk from a neonatal unit (n = 10), and term milk from the community (n = 11) were analyzed for fatty acids, malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, and hexanal.

Study registration

NCT03573531.

Results

DHM had significantly lower absolute LCPUFA content than term (P < .001) and significantly lower ω-3 PUFAs than preterm milk (P < .05), although relative LCPUFA composition did not differ. Exclusive DHM feeding leads to significantly lower fat (3.7 vs 6.7 g/d) and LCPUFA (docosahexaenoic acid [DHA]: 10.6 vs 16.8 mg/d; arachidonic acid [ARA]: 17.4 vs 25.2 mg/d) intake than recommended by the European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, and provides 17.3% and 43.1% of the in utero accreted ARA and DHA. DHM had the highest proportion of lipid peroxidation.

Conclusions

This study confirms that DHM in the United Kingdom has insufficient LCPUFAs for preterm infants. It demonstrates for the first time that DHM has the highest level of lipid peroxidation, compared with preterm or term milk. This has important implications for preterm infant nutrition, as exclusive DHM feeding might not be suitable long term and may contribute to the development of major preterm neonatal morbidities.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/33265/

Source: Europe PubMed Central

Long‐Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Lipid Peroxidation Products in Donor Human Milk in the United Kingdom: Results From the LIMIT 2‐Centre Cross‐Sectional Study

Authors: Nessell, I., De Rooy, L., Khashu, M., Murphy, J. and Dyall, S.C.

Journal: Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition

Volume: 44

Issue: 8

Pages: 1501-1509

ISSN: 0148-6071

Abstract:

Background: Donor human milk is increasingly used as alternative to mother’s own milk to feed preterm infants, however, it may provide less long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LCPUFA), and more oxidised lipids, which may be detrimental for preterm infant health and development. Levels have not been reported for donor human milk in the U.K.

Methods: Donor human milk (n=19) from two neonatal units, milk from preterm mothers from a neonatal unit (n=10), and term mothers from the community (n=11) were analysed for fatty acid, malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, and hexanal content. Study registration: NCT03573531 Results: Donor human milk had significantly lower absolute LCPUFA content compared to term milk (P<0.001) and significantly lower omega-3 PUFAs than preterm milk (P<0.05), although relative LCPUFA composition did not differ. Exclusive donor human milk feeding leads to significantly lower fat (3.7 vs. 6.7 g/d) and LCPUFA (DHA: 10.6 vs. 16.8 mg/d; ARA: 17.4 vs. 25.2 mg/d) intake than recommended by ESPGHAN, and provides only 17.3% and 43.1% of the in utero accreted ARA and DHA. Donor human milk also had the highest proportion of lipid peroxidation.

Conclusions: This study confirms that donor human milk in the U.K. has insufficient levels of LCPUFAs for preterm infants. It demonstrates for the first time that donor human milk has the highest level of lipid peroxidation, compared to preterm or term milk. This has important implications for preterm infant nutrition, as exclusive donor human milk feeding might not be suitable long-term, and may contribute to the development of major preterm neonatal morbidities.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/33265/

Source: BURO EPrints