The values of only-children: Power and benevolence in the spotlight

Authors: Griffiths, N.L., Thomas, K., Dyer, B., Rea, J. and Bardi, A.

Journal: Journal of Research in Personality

Volume: 92

eISSN: 1095-7251

ISSN: 0092-6566

DOI: 10.1016/j.jrp.2021.104096

Abstract:

The stereotype that only-children are more self-centered than others has gained little support from studies on personality traits but had not been previously tested with respect to personal values, which are also an important part of personality. Data from 3085 Australian adults revealed that only-children give more importance to power values and less importance to benevolence values than individuals with siblings. These differences, which are consistent with the stereotype, were strongest in young people but diminished gradually with age and disappeared in those over 62 years old. The results challenge the view that personality is largely unaffected by shared life-experiences associated with family structure, at least regarding the values aspect of personality.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/35334/

Source: Scopus

The values of only-children: Power and benevolence in the spotlight

Authors: Griffiths, N.L., Thomas, K., Dyer, B., Rea, J. and Bardi, A.

Journal: JOURNAL OF RESEARCH IN PERSONALITY

Volume: 92

eISSN: 1095-7251

ISSN: 0092-6566

DOI: 10.1016/j.jrp.2021.104096

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/35334/

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

The Values of Only-Children: Power and Benevolence in the Spotlight

Authors: Griffiths, N., Thomas, K., Dyer, B., Rea, J. and Bardi, A.

Journal: Journal of Research in Personality

Publisher: Elsevier

ISSN: 0092-6566

Abstract:

The stereotype that only-children are more self-centered than others has gained little support from studies on personality traits but had not been previously tested with respect to personal values, which are also an important part of personality. Data from 3085 Australian adults revealed that only-children give more importance to power values and less importance to benevolence values than individuals with siblings. These differences, which are consistent with the stereotype, were strongest in young people but diminished gradually with age and disappeared in those over 62 years old. The results challenge the view that personality is largely unaffected by shared life-experiences associated with family structure, at least regarding the values aspect of personality.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/35334/

Source: Manual