Levels of Self-representation and Their Sociocognitive Correlates in Late-Diagnosed Autistic Adults

Authors: Moseley, R.L., Liu, C.H., Gregory, N.J., Smith, P., Baron-Cohen, S. and Sui, J.

Journal: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

eISSN: 1573-3432

ISSN: 0162-3257

DOI: 10.1007/s10803-021-05251-x

Abstract:

The cognitive representation of oneself is central to other sociocognitive processes, including relations with others. It is reflected in faster, more accurate processing of self-relevant information, a “self-prioritisation effect” (SPE) which is inconsistent across studies in autism. Across two tasks with autistic and non-autistic participants, we explored the SPE and its relationship to autistic traits, mentalizing ability and loneliness. A SPE was intact in both groups, but together the two tasks suggested a reduced tendency of late-diagnosed autistic participants to differentiate between familiar and unfamiliar others and greater ease disengaging from the self-concept. Correlations too revealed a complex picture, which we attempt to explore and disentangle with reference to the inconsistency across self-processing studies in autism, highlighting implications for future research.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/35948/

Source: Scopus

Levels of Self-representation and Their Sociocognitive Correlates in Late-Diagnosed Autistic Adults.

Authors: Moseley, R.L., Liu, C.H., Gregory, N.J., Smith, P., Baron-Cohen, S. and Sui, J.

Journal: J Autism Dev Disord

eISSN: 1573-3432

DOI: 10.1007/s10803-021-05251-x

Abstract:

The cognitive representation of oneself is central to other sociocognitive processes, including relations with others. It is reflected in faster, more accurate processing of self-relevant information, a "self-prioritisation effect" (SPE) which is inconsistent across studies in autism. Across two tasks with autistic and non-autistic participants, we explored the SPE and its relationship to autistic traits, mentalizing ability and loneliness. A SPE was intact in both groups, but together the two tasks suggested a reduced tendency of late-diagnosed autistic participants to differentiate between familiar and unfamiliar others and greater ease disengaging from the self-concept. Correlations too revealed a complex picture, which we attempt to explore and disentangle with reference to the inconsistency across self-processing studies in autism, highlighting implications for future research.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/35948/

Source: PubMed

Levels of Self-representation and Their Sociocognitive Correlates in Late-Diagnosed Autistic Adults

Authors: Moseley, R.L., Liu, C.H., Gregory, N.J., Smith, P., Baron-Cohen, S. and Sui, J.

Journal: JOURNAL OF AUTISM AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISORDERS

eISSN: 1573-3432

ISSN: 0162-3257

DOI: 10.1007/s10803-021-05251-x

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/35948/

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

Levels of Self‑representation and Their Sociocognitive Correlates in Late‑Diagnosed Autistic Adults

Authors: Moseley, R., Liu, C., Gregory, N., Smith, P., Baron-Cohen, S. and Sui, J.

Journal: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISSN: 0162-3257

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/35948/

Source: Manual

Levels of Self-representation and Their Sociocognitive Correlates in Late-Diagnosed Autistic Adults.

Authors: Moseley, R.L., Liu, C.H., Gregory, N.J., Smith, P., Baron-Cohen, S. and Sui, J.

Journal: Journal of autism and developmental disorders

Volume: 52

Issue: 7

Pages: 3246-3259

eISSN: 1573-3432

ISSN: 0162-3257

DOI: 10.1007/s10803-021-05251-x

Abstract:

The cognitive representation of oneself is central to other sociocognitive processes, including relations with others. It is reflected in faster, more accurate processing of self-relevant information, a "self-prioritisation effect" (SPE) which is inconsistent across studies in autism. Across two tasks with autistic and non-autistic participants, we explored the SPE and its relationship to autistic traits, mentalizing ability and loneliness. A SPE was intact in both groups, but together the two tasks suggested a reduced tendency of late-diagnosed autistic participants to differentiate between familiar and unfamiliar others and greater ease disengaging from the self-concept. Correlations too revealed a complex picture, which we attempt to explore and disentangle with reference to the inconsistency across self-processing studies in autism, highlighting implications for future research.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/35948/

Source: Europe PubMed Central

Levels of Self-representation and Their Sociocognitive Correlates in Late-Diagnosed Autistic Adults.

Authors: Moseley, R.L., Liu, C.H., Gregory, N.J., Smith, P., Baron-Cohen, S. and Sui, J.

Journal: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

ISSN: 0162-3257

Abstract:

The cognitive representation of oneself is central to other sociocognitive processes, including relations with others. It is reflected in faster, more accurate processing of self-relevant information, a "self-prioritisation effect" (SPE) which is inconsistent across studies in autism. Across two tasks with autistic and non-autistic participants, we explored the SPE and its relationship to autistic traits, mentalizing ability and loneliness. A SPE was intact in both groups, but together the two tasks suggested a reduced tendency of late-diagnosed autistic participants to differentiate between familiar and unfamiliar others and greater ease disengaging from the self-concept. Correlations too revealed a complex picture, which we attempt to explore and disentangle with reference to the inconsistency across self-processing studies in autism, highlighting implications for future research.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/35948/

Source: BURO EPrints