Virtual reality used to distract eczematous children from distressing symptoms: A pilot evaluation

Authors: Singleton, H., Holley, D., Arden-Close, E., Yang, X., Cui, Y. and Ersser, S.

Journal: Dermatological Nursing

Volume: 21

Issue: 1

Pages: 39-44

Publisher: Dr. Richard Hawkins

ISSN: 1477-3368

Abstract:

Abstract Background: Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a debilitating disease with high disease burden. Virtual reality (VR) could be used as a more sophisticated and immersive version of guided imagery to manage AD.

Aims: To co-create and evaluate prototypes for immersive and non-immersive VR software designed to distract eczematous children from their pruritis.

Methods: Through an online survey and online semi-structured interviews, children co-designed VR games and a 360 video with software developers, which they evaluated by completing the Children’s Dermatology Life Quality Index cartoon questionnaire (n=4) and a usability questionnaire (n=10).

Results: Children accessed the VR software using a fully immersive Oculus Quest² headset. All children felt their skin was less affected both during and after playing the VR Chillout games, relative to pre-play. Nearly all (n=9) reported that the games were very or quite easy to use.

Conclusions: VR software has potential to improve pruritis and quality of life in eczematous children.

Technical challenges to resolve include ‘fittings’ of VR equipment to small faces. Subsequent work will extend these findings with a more diverse range of families to support children with eczema.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/37524/

Source: Manual

Virtual reality used to distract eczematous children from distressing symptoms: A pilot evaluation

Authors: Singleton, H., Holley, D., Arden-Close, E., Yang, X., Cui, Y. and Ersser, S.J.

Journal: Dermatological Nursing

Volume: 21

Issue: 1

Pages: 39-44

Publisher: Dr. Richard Hawkins

ISSN: 1477-3368

Abstract:

Abstract Background: Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a debilitating disease with high disease burden. Virtual reality (VR) could be used as a more sophisticated and immersive version of guided imagery to manage AD.

Aims: To co-create and evaluate prototypes for immersive and non-immersive VR software designed to distract eczematous children from their pruritis.

Methods: Through an online survey and online semi-structured interviews, children co-designed VR games and a 360 video with software developers, which they evaluated by completing the Children’s Dermatology Life Quality Index cartoon questionnaire (n=4) and a usability questionnaire (n=10).

Results: Children accessed the VR software using a fully immersive Oculus Quest² headset. All children felt their skin was less affected both during and after playing the VR Chillout games, relative to pre-play. Nearly all (n=9) reported that the games were very or quite easy to use.

Conclusions: VR software has potential to improve pruritis and quality of life in eczematous children.

Technical challenges to resolve include ‘fittings’ of VR equipment to small faces. Subsequent work will extend these findings with a more diverse range of families to support children with eczema.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/37524/

Source: BURO EPrints