Graphene-Based Electrochemical Sensors for Psychoactive Drugs

Authors: Boroujerdi, R. and Paul, R.

Journal: Nanomaterials

Volume: 12

Issue: 13

eISSN: 2079-4991

DOI: 10.3390/nano12132250

Abstract:

Sensors developed from nanomaterials are increasingly used in a variety of fields, from simple wearable or medical sensors to be used at home to monitor health, to more complicated sensors being used by border customs or aviation industries. In recent times, nanoparticle-based sensors have begun to revolutionize drug-detection techniques, mainly due to their affordability, ease of use and portability, compared to conventional chromatography techniques. Thin graphene layers provide a significantly high surface to weight ratio compared to other nanomaterials, a characteristic that has led to the design of more sensitive and reliable sensors. The exceptional properties of graphene coupled with its potential to be tuned to target specific molecules have made graphene-based sensors one of the most popular and well-researched sensing materials of the past two decades with applications in environmental monitoring, medical diagnostics, and industries. Here, we present a review of developments in the applications of graphene-based sensors in sensing drugs such as cocaine, morphine, methamphetamine, ketamine, tramadol and so forth in the past decade. We compare graphene sensors with other sensors developed from ultrathin two-dimensional materials, such as transition-metal dichalcogenides, hexagonal boron nitrate, and MXenes, to measure drugs directly and indirectly, in various samples.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/37173/

Source: Scopus

Graphene-Based Electrochemical Sensors for Psychoactive Drugs.

Authors: Boroujerdi, R. and Paul, R.

Journal: Nanomaterials (Basel)

Volume: 12

Issue: 13

ISSN: 2079-4991

DOI: 10.3390/nano12132250

Abstract:

Sensors developed from nanomaterials are increasingly used in a variety of fields, from simple wearable or medical sensors to be used at home to monitor health, to more complicated sensors being used by border customs or aviation industries. In recent times, nanoparticle-based sensors have begun to revolutionize drug-detection techniques, mainly due to their affordability, ease of use and portability, compared to conventional chromatography techniques. Thin graphene layers provide a significantly high surface to weight ratio compared to other nanomaterials, a characteristic that has led to the design of more sensitive and reliable sensors. The exceptional properties of graphene coupled with its potential to be tuned to target specific molecules have made graphene-based sensors one of the most popular and well-researched sensing materials of the past two decades with applications in environmental monitoring, medical diagnostics, and industries. Here, we present a review of developments in the applications of graphene-based sensors in sensing drugs such as cocaine, morphine, methamphetamine, ketamine, tramadol and so forth in the past decade. We compare graphene sensors with other sensors developed from ultrathin two-dimensional materials, such as transition-metal dichalcogenides, hexagonal boron nitrate, and MXenes, to measure drugs directly and indirectly, in various samples.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/37173/

Source: PubMed

Graphene-Based Electrochemical Sensors for Psychoactive Drugs

Authors: Boroujerdi, R. and Paul, R.

Journal: NANOMATERIALS

Volume: 12

Issue: 13

eISSN: 2079-4991

DOI: 10.3390/nano12132250

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/37173/

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

Graphene based electrochemical sensors for psychoactive drugs

Authors: Boroujerdi, R. and Paul, R.

Journal: Nanomaterials

Publisher: MDPI AG

ISSN: 2079-4991

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/37173/

Source: Manual

Graphene-Based Electrochemical Sensors for Psychoactive Drugs.

Authors: Boroujerdi, R. and Paul, R.

Journal: Nanomaterials (Basel, Switzerland)

Volume: 12

Issue: 13

Pages: 2250

eISSN: 2079-4991

ISSN: 2079-4991

DOI: 10.3390/nano12132250

Abstract:

Sensors developed from nanomaterials are increasingly used in a variety of fields, from simple wearable or medical sensors to be used at home to monitor health, to more complicated sensors being used by border customs or aviation industries. In recent times, nanoparticle-based sensors have begun to revolutionize drug-detection techniques, mainly due to their affordability, ease of use and portability, compared to conventional chromatography techniques. Thin graphene layers provide a significantly high surface to weight ratio compared to other nanomaterials, a characteristic that has led to the design of more sensitive and reliable sensors. The exceptional properties of graphene coupled with its potential to be tuned to target specific molecules have made graphene-based sensors one of the most popular and well-researched sensing materials of the past two decades with applications in environmental monitoring, medical diagnostics, and industries. Here, we present a review of developments in the applications of graphene-based sensors in sensing drugs such as cocaine, morphine, methamphetamine, ketamine, tramadol and so forth in the past decade. We compare graphene sensors with other sensors developed from ultrathin two-dimensional materials, such as transition-metal dichalcogenides, hexagonal boron nitrate, and MXenes, to measure drugs directly and indirectly, in various samples.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/37173/

Source: Europe PubMed Central

Graphene-Based Electrochemical Sensors for Psychoactive Drugs

Authors: Boroujerdi, R. and Paul, R.

Journal: Nanomaterials

Volume: 12

Issue: 13

Publisher: MDPI AG

ISSN: 2079-4991

Abstract:

Sensors developed from nanomaterials are increasingly used in a variety of fields, from simple wearable or medical sensors to be used at home to monitor health, to more complicated sensors being used by border customs or aviation industries. In recent times, nanoparticle-based sensors have begun to revolutionize drug-detection techniques, mainly due to their affordability, ease of use and portability, compared to conventional chromatography techniques. Thin graphene layers provide a significantly high surface to weight ratio compared to other nanomaterials, a characteristic that has led to the design of more sensitive and reliable sensors. The exceptional properties of graphene coupled with its potential to be tuned to target specific molecules have made graphene-based sensors one of the most popular and well-researched sensing materials of the past two decades with applications in environmental monitoring, medical diagnostics, and industries. Here, we present a review of developments in the applications of graphene-based sensors in sensing drugs such as cocaine, morphine, methamphetamine, ketamine, tramadol and so forth in the past decade. We compare graphene sensors with other sensors developed from ultrathin two-dimensional materials, such as transition-metal dichalcogenides, hexagonal boron nitrate, and MXenes, to measure drugs directly and indirectly, in various samples.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/37173/

Source: BURO EPrints