Self-compassion, coping strategies and gender differences in psychology, counselling and psychotherapy practitioners during COVID-19: Lessons learnt

Authors: Keyes, J., Yankouskaya, A. and Panourgia, C.

Journal: Counselling and Psychotherapy Research

Volume: 23

Issue: 4

Pages: 1052-1062

eISSN: 1746-1405

ISSN: 1473-3145

DOI: 10.1002/capr.12574

Abstract:

Effective coping strategies can protect against the adverse effects of stress. This study investigated self-compassion's ability to predict approach and avoidance coping in psychology, counselling and psychotherapy practitioners (PCPPs) during COVID-19, and whether this differed between genders. To date, no research has investigated this relationship, despite positive associations being drawn in other populations. Three hundred and nineteen PCPPs completed an online survey including the Brief COPE and Self-Compassion Short Form. Self-compassion significantly predicted greater use of approach coping and reduced use of avoidance coping. The predictive ability of self-compassion was slightly better in female practitioners. Self-judgement arose as a prominent subscale of self-compassion across genders, increasing both approach and avoidance coping. Implications for future research and practice are discussed, concerning barriers to self-compassion and the requirement of therapeutic programmes and psychoeducation as a prerequisite for effective coping strategies in the PCPP population.

https://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/37339/

Source: Scopus

Self-compassion, coping strategies and gender differences in psychology, counselling and psychotherapy practitioners during COVID-19: Lessons learnt.

Authors: Keyes, J., Yankouskaya, A. and Panourgia, C.

Journal: Couns Psychother Res

ISSN: 1473-3145

DOI: 10.1002/capr.12574

Abstract:

Effective coping strategies can protect against the adverse effects of stress. This study investigated self-compassion's ability to predict approach and avoidance coping in psychology, counselling and psychotherapy practitioners (PCPPs) during COVID-19, and whether this differed between genders. To date, no research has investigated this relationship, despite positive associations being drawn in other populations. Three hundred and nineteen PCPPs completed an online survey including the Brief COPE and Self-Compassion Short Form. Self-compassion significantly predicted greater use of approach coping and reduced use of avoidance coping. The predictive ability of self-compassion was slightly better in female practitioners. Self-judgement arose as a prominent subscale of self-compassion across genders, increasing both approach and avoidance coping. Implications for future research and practice are discussed, concerning barriers to self-compassion and the requirement of therapeutic programmes and psychoeducation as a prerequisite for effective coping strategies in the PCPP population.

https://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/37339/

Source: PubMed

Self-compassion, coping strategies and gender differences in psychology, counselling and psychotherapy practitioners during COVID-19: Lessons learnt

Authors: Keyes, J., Yankouskaya, A. and Panourgia, C.

Journal: COUNSELLING & PSYCHOTHERAPY RESEARCH

eISSN: 1746-1405

ISSN: 1473-3145

DOI: 10.1002/capr.12574

https://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/37339/

Source: Web of Science (Lite)

Self‐compassion, coping strategies and gender differences in psychology, counselling and psychotherapy practitioners during COVID‐19: Lessons learnt

Authors: Keyes, J., Yankouskaya, A. and Panourgia, C.

Journal: Counselling and Psychotherapy Research

Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell

ISSN: 1473-3145

DOI: 10.1002/capr.12574

https://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/37339/

Source: Manual

Self-compassion, coping strategies and gender differences in psychology, counselling and psychotherapy practitioners during COVID-19: Lessons learnt.

Authors: Keyes, J., Yankouskaya, A. and Panourgia, C.

Journal: Counselling and psychotherapy research

eISSN: 1746-1405

ISSN: 1473-3145

DOI: 10.1002/capr.12574

Abstract:

Effective coping strategies can protect against the adverse effects of stress. This study investigated self-compassion's ability to predict approach and avoidance coping in psychology, counselling and psychotherapy practitioners (PCPPs) during COVID-19, and whether this differed between genders. To date, no research has investigated this relationship, despite positive associations being drawn in other populations. Three hundred and nineteen PCPPs completed an online survey including the Brief COPE and Self-Compassion Short Form. Self-compassion significantly predicted greater use of approach coping and reduced use of avoidance coping. The predictive ability of self-compassion was slightly better in female practitioners. Self-judgement arose as a prominent subscale of self-compassion across genders, increasing both approach and avoidance coping. Implications for future research and practice are discussed, concerning barriers to self-compassion and the requirement of therapeutic programmes and psychoeducation as a prerequisite for effective coping strategies in the PCPP population.

https://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/37339/

Source: Europe PubMed Central

Self‐compassion, coping strategies and gender differences in psychology, counselling and psychotherapy practitioners during COVID‐19: Lessons learnt

Authors: Keyes, J., Yankouskaya, A. and Panourgia, C.

Journal: Counselling and Psychotherapy Research

Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell

ISSN: 1473-3145

Abstract:

Effective coping strategies can protect against the adverse effects of stress. This study investigated self-compassion's ability to predict approach and avoidance coping in psychology, counselling and psychotherapy practitioners (PCPPs) during COVID-19, and whether this differed between genders. To date, no research has investigated this relationship, despite positive associations being drawn in other populations. Three hundred and nineteen PCPPs completed an online survey including the Brief COPE and Self-Compassion Short Form. Self-compassion significantly predicted greater use of approach coping and reduced use of avoidance coping. The predictive ability of self-compassion was slightly better in female practitioners. Self-judgement arose as a prominent subscale of self-compassion across genders, increasing both approach and avoidance coping. Implications for future research and practice are discussed, concerning barriers to self-compassion and the requirement of therapeutic programmes and psychoeducation as a prerequisite for effective coping strategies in the PCPP population.

https://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/37339/

Source: BURO EPrints