Multidisciplinary analysis of a mummified cranium claimed to be that of a medieval execution victim

This source preferred by Paul Kneller, Harry Manley and Martin Smith

Authors: Smith, M., Kneller, P., Elliott, D., Young, C., Manley, H. and Osselton, D.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/22923/

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12520-011-0084-x

Journal: Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences

Volume: 4

Pages: 75-89

Publisher: Springer Berlin / Heidelberg

ISSN: 1866-9557

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Smith, M.J., Kneller, P., Elliott, D., Young, C., Manley, H. and Osselton, D.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/22923/

Journal: Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences

Volume: 4

Issue: 1

Pages: 75-89

eISSN: 1866-9565

ISSN: 1866-9557

DOI: 10.1007/s12520-011-0084-x

This article presents a multidisciplinary analysis of a human skull with preserved soft tissue curated by a small museum in Boscastle, Cornwall, UK. The skull lacks a mandible and is coated in a black tar-like substance. Records left by a previous museum curator (now deceased) claimed the skull to be the head of a medieval execution victim. The skull was purportedly recovered from a London church that was destroyed during the Second World War where it had been kept in a carved oak box. If these details are correct, the skull would appear to have been venerated as a relic. The skull and box have been analysed using a range of techniques including computerised tomography, laser scanning, microscopy, infrared spectroscopy and radiocarbon dating. These analyses demonstrated the skull in fact to be that of an Egyptian mummy dating from the Ptolemaic period. Other instances have been noted of parts of Egyptian mummies being presented as European saintly relics, and the 'Boscastle skull' would appear to be an example of such. A wider point illustrated by the work presented here is that sufficient application of modern analytical techniques may reveal considerable information regarding human remains which otherwise have little or no provenance. This point strengthens arguments for the retention of such remains by curating institutions. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Smith, M.J., Kneller, P., Elliott, D., Young, C., Manley, H. and Osselton, D.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/22923/

Journal: ARCHAEOLOGICAL AND ANTHROPOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Volume: 4

Issue: 1

Pages: 75-89

ISSN: 1866-9557

DOI: 10.1007/s12520-011-0084-x

The data on this page was last updated at 05:14 on July 22, 2019.