Cosserat-beam-based dynamic response modelling

This source preferred by Jian Chang and Jian Jun Zhang

Authors: Chang, J., Shepherd, D. and Zhang, J.J.

http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/114285964/abstract

Journal: Computer Animation and Virtual Worlds

Volume: 18

Pages: 429-436

ISSN: 1546-4261

DOI: 10.1002/cav.197

The Cosserat beam model is traditionally used to describe the mechanics of a flexible beam, which is a one-dimensional entity. In this paper we apply the Cosserat beam model to an arbitrary three-dimensional object for fast simulation of its vibration behaviours. We encage a detailed mesh model of an object inside a much simpler supporting framework whose edges are effectively the beams (struts) of the Cosserat model. The paper focuses first on extracting the modes of vibration of the framework. Once this is done, dynamic deformations can then be quickly simulated with respect to any applied constraints and dynamic stimuli. The aim of this method is to offer realism traditionally only afforded by the finite element methods (FEMs) while providing more sophistication than the mass-spring method.

This data was imported from DBLP:

Authors: Chang, J., Shepherd, D.X. and Zhang, J.J.

Journal: Journal of Visualization and Computer Animation

Volume: 18

Pages: 429-436

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Chang, J., Shepherd, D.X. and Zhang, J.J.

Journal: Computer Animation and Virtual Worlds

Volume: 18

Issue: 4-5

Pages: 429-436

eISSN: 1546-427X

ISSN: 1546-4261

DOI: 10.1002/cav.197

The Cosserat beam model is traditionally used to describe the mechanics of a flexible beam, which is a one-dimensional entity. In this paper we apply the Cosserat beam model to an arbitrary three-dimensional object for fast simulation of its vibration behaviours. We encage a detailed mesh model of an object inside a much simpler supporting framework whose edges are effectively the beams (struts) of the Cosserat model. The paper focuses first on extracting the modes of vibration of the framework. Once this is done, dynamic deformations can then be quickly simulated with respect to any applied constraints and dynamic stimuli. The aim of this method is to offer realism traditionally only afforded by the finite element methods (FEMs) while providing more sophistication than the mass-spring method. Copyright © 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Chang, J., Shepherd, D.X. and Zhang, J.J.

Journal: COMPUTER ANIMATION AND VIRTUAL WORLDS

Volume: 18

Issue: 4-5

Pages: 429-436

eISSN: 1546-427X

ISSN: 1546-4261

DOI: 10.1002/cav.197

The data on this page was last updated at 04:49 on May 22, 2018.