Virtual reality training and assessment in laparoscopic rectum surgery

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Pan, J.J., Chang, J., Yang, X., Liang, H., Zhang, J.J., Qureshi, T., Howell, R. and Hickish, T.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/21411/

Journal: Int J Med Robot

Volume: 11

Issue: 2

Pages: 194-209

eISSN: 1478-596X

DOI: 10.1002/rcs.1582

BACKGROUND: Virtual-reality (VR) based simulation techniques offer an efficient and low cost alternative to conventional surgery training. This article describes a VR training and assessment system in laparoscopic rectum surgery. METHODS: To give a realistic visual performance of interaction between membrane tissue and surgery tools, a generalized cylinder based collision detection and a multi-layer mass-spring model are presented. A dynamic assessment model is also designed for hierarchy training evaluation. RESULTS: With this simulator, trainees can operate on the virtual rectum with both visual and haptic sensation feedback simultaneously. The system also offers surgeons instructions in real time when improper manipulation happens. The simulator has been tested and evaluated by ten subjects. CONCLUSIONS: This prototype system has been verified by colorectal surgeons through a pilot study. They believe the visual performance and the tactile feedback are realistic. It exhibits the potential to effectively improve the surgical skills of trainee surgeons and significantly shorten their learning curve.

This source preferred by Jian Chang, Tamas Hickish, Jian Jun Zhang and Xiaosong Yang

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Pan, J.J., Chang, J., Yang, X., Liang, H., Zhang, J.J., Qureshi, T., Howell, R. and Hickish, T.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/21411/

Journal: International Journal of Medical Robotics and Computer Assisted Surgery

Volume: 11

Issue: 2

Pages: 194-209

eISSN: 1478-596X

ISSN: 1478-5951

DOI: 10.1002/rcs.1582

© 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.. Background: Virtual-reality (VR) based simulation techniques offer an efficient and low cost alternative to conventional surgery training. This article describes a VR training and assessment system in laparoscopic rectum surgery. Methods: To give a realistic visual performance of interaction between membrane tissue and surgery tools, a generalized cylinder based collision detection and a multi-layer mass-spring model are presented. A dynamic assessment model is also designed for hierarchy training evaluation. Results: With this simulator, trainees can operate on the virtual rectum with both visual and haptic sensation feedback simultaneously. The system also offers surgeons instructions in real time when improper manipulation happens. The simulator has been tested and evaluated by ten subjects. Conclusions: This prototype system has been verified by colorectal surgeons through a pilot study. They believe the visual performance and the tactile feedback are realistic. It exhibits the potential to effectively improve the surgical skills of trainee surgeons and significantly shorten their learning curve.

This source preferred by Jian Chang, Tamas Hickish, Jian Jun Zhang and Xiaosong Yang

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Pan, J.J., Chang, J., Yang, X., Zhang, J.J., Qureshi, T., Howell, R., Hickish, T. and Liang, H.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/21411/

Journal: International Journal of Medical Robotics and Computer Assisted Surgery

eISSN: 1478-596X

ISSN: 1478-5951

DOI: 10.1002/rcs.1582

Background: Virtual-reality (VR) based simulation techniques offer an efficient and low cost alternative to conventional surgery training. This article describes a VR training and assessment system in laparoscopic rectum surgery. Methods: To give a realistic visual performance of interaction between membrane tissue and surgery tools, a generalized cylinder based collision detection and a multi-layer mass-spring model are presented. A dynamic assessment model is also designed for hierarchy training evaluation. Results: With this simulator, trainees can operate on the virtual rectum with both visual and haptic sensation feedback simultaneously. The system also offers surgeons instructions in real time when improper manipulation happens. The simulator has been tested and evaluated by ten subjects. Conclusions: This prototype system has been verified by colorectal surgeons through a pilot study. They believe the visual performance and the tactile feedback are realistic. It exhibits the potential to effectively improve the surgical skills of trainee surgeons and significantly shorten their learning curve. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Pan, J.J., Chang, J., Yang, X., Liang, H., Zhang, J.J., Qureshi, T., Howell, R. and Hickish, T.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/21411/

Journal: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MEDICAL ROBOTICS AND COMPUTER ASSISTED SURGERY

Volume: 11

Issue: 2

Pages: 194-209

eISSN: 1478-596X

ISSN: 1478-5951

DOI: 10.1002/rcs.1582

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Pan, J.J., Chang, J., Yang, X., Liang, H., Zhang, J.J., Qureshi, T., Howell, R. and Hickish, T.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/21411/

Journal: The international journal of medical robotics + computer assisted surgery : MRCAS

Volume: 11

Issue: 2

Pages: 194-209

eISSN: 1478-596X

ISSN: 1478-5951

Virtual-reality (VR) based simulation techniques offer an efficient and low cost alternative to conventional surgery training. This article describes a VR training and assessment system in laparoscopic rectum surgery.To give a realistic visual performance of interaction between membrane tissue and surgery tools, a generalized cylinder based collision detection and a multi-layer mass-spring model are presented. A dynamic assessment model is also designed for hierarchy training evaluation.With this simulator, trainees can operate on the virtual rectum with both visual and haptic sensation feedback simultaneously. The system also offers surgeons instructions in real time when improper manipulation happens. The simulator has been tested and evaluated by ten subjects.This prototype system has been verified by colorectal surgeons through a pilot study. They believe the visual performance and the tactile feedback are realistic. It exhibits the potential to effectively improve the surgical skills of trainee surgeons and significantly shorten their learning curve.

The data on this page was last updated at 04:59 on August 21, 2018.