Developments in the trans-tibial prosthetic socket fitting process: A review of past and present research

This source preferred by John Vinney, Siamak Noroozi and Philip Sewell

Authors: Sewell, P., Noroozi, S., Vinney, J. and Andrews, S.

http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content~db=all?content=10.1080/03093640008726532

Journal: Prosthetics and Orthotics International

Volume: 24

Pages: 97-107

ISSN: 0309-3646

DOI: 10.1080/03093640008726532

A revolution in trans-tibial prosthetic design began at the end of World War II with the development of new materials and a dramatic improvement in the understanding of biomechanics. Early research was based mainly on the improvement of existing prosthetic design practice. Today, research has been focused on providing a better understanding of stump/socket interface biomechanics and improving socket fit by attempting to quantify the normal/direct stresses at the interface.

The purpose of this review paper is to question whether research and prosthetic education/training to date has significantly improved our understanding of what makes a good socket. Although there is no doubt that advances in socket fitting techniques have been made what is not clear is the actual extent to which these advances have improved the quality of sockets fitted.

It is suggested that a new approach is needed which can overcome some of the inherent problems of designing and manufacturing a comfortable high quality socket. It is also suggested that current research and education/training in the fields of pressure/interfacial interaction measurement and Finite Element Analysis techniques have limited potential to address many of these problems. There is also little evidence that current computer aided design systems offer any significant advantages over more conventional techniques.

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Sewell, P., Noroozi, S., Vinney, J. and Andrews, S.

Journal: Prosthet Orthot Int

Volume: 24

Issue: 2

Pages: 97-107

ISSN: 0309-3646

DOI: 10.1080/03093640008726532

A revolution in trans-tibial prosthetic design began at the end of World War II with the development of new materials and a dramatic improvement in the understanding of biomechanics. Early research was based mainly on the improvement of existing prosthetic design practice. Today, research has been focused on providing a better understanding of stump/socket interface biomechanics and improving socket fit by attempting to quantify the normal/direct stresses at the interface. The purpose of this review paper is to question whether research and prosthetic education/training to date has significantly improved our understanding of what makes a good socket. Although there is no doubt that advances in socket fitting techniques have been made what is not clear is the actual extent to which these advances have improved the quality of sockets fitted. It is suggested that a new approach is needed which can overcome some of the inherent problems of designing and manufacturing a comfortable high quality socket. It is also suggested that current research and education/training in the fields of pressure/interfacial interaction measurement and Finite Element Analysis techniques have limited potential to address many of these problems. There is also little evidence that current computer aided design systems offer any significant advantages over more conventional techniques.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Sewell, P., Noroozi, S., Vinney, J. and Andrews, S.

Journal: Prosthetics and Orthotics International

Volume: 24

Issue: 2

Pages: 97-107

ISSN: 0309-3646

DOI: 10.1080/03093640008726532

A revolution in trans-tibial prosthetic design began at the end of World War II with the development of new materials and a dramatic improvement in the understanding of biomechanics. Early research was based mainly on the improvement of existing prosthetic design practice. Today, research has been focused on providing a better understanding of stump/socket interface biomechanics and improving socket fit by attempting to quantify the normal/direct stresses at the interface. The purpose of this review paper is to question whether research and prosthetic education/training to date has significantly improved our understanding of what makes a good socket. Although there is no doubt that advances in socket fitting techniques have been made what is not clear is the actual extent to which these advances have improved the quality of sockets fitted. It is suggested that a new approach is needed which can overcome some of the inherent problems of designing and manufacturing a comfortable high quality socket. It is also suggested that current research and education/training in the fields of pressure/interfacial interaction measurement and Finite Element Analysis techniques have limited potential to address many of these problems. There is also little evidence that current computer aided design systems offer any significant advantages over more conventional techniques.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Sewell, P., Noroozi, S., Vinney, J. and Andrews, S.

Journal: PROSTHETICS AND ORTHOTICS INTERNATIONAL

Volume: 24

Issue: 2

Pages: 97-107

ISSN: 0309-3646

DOI: 10.1080/03093640008726532

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Sewell, P., Noroozi, S., Vinney, J. and Andrews, S.

Journal: Prosthetics and orthotics international

Volume: 24

Issue: 2

Pages: 97-107

eISSN: 1746-1553

ISSN: 0309-3646

A revolution in trans-tibial prosthetic design began at the end of World War II with the development of new materials and a dramatic improvement in the understanding of biomechanics. Early research was based mainly on the improvement of existing prosthetic design practice. Today, research has been focused on providing a better understanding of stump/socket interface biomechanics and improving socket fit by attempting to quantify the normal/direct stresses at the interface. The purpose of this review paper is to question whether research and prosthetic education/training to date has significantly improved our understanding of what makes a good socket. Although there is no doubt that advances in socket fitting techniques have been made what is not clear is the actual extent to which these advances have improved the quality of sockets fitted. It is suggested that a new approach is needed which can overcome some of the inherent problems of designing and manufacturing a comfortable high quality socket. It is also suggested that current research and education/training in the fields of pressure/interfacial interaction measurement and Finite Element Analysis techniques have limited potential to address many of these problems. There is also little evidence that current computer aided design systems offer any significant advantages over more conventional techniques.

The data on this page was last updated at 10:28 on April 24, 2019.